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Basically I need a type of delay in returning values: So if my method SlowThinker is given the strings "Hello", then "Goodbye", then "See you later", it needs to return "" (the empty string), then "Hello", then "Goodbye" (and so forth, always one behind its current input).

So far I tried to save all inputs in an array but I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong in my implementation:

public class SlowThinker {
private String[] sayings = new String[20];
private int i = 0;
public int increment(){
    while(true){
        i++;
        return i;
    }
}
public String transform(String stringToTransform){
    sayings[0] = "";
    sayings[increment()] = stringToTransform;
    return sayings[increment()-1];
}

}

I am also using the following as my Tester in a different class:

assertEquals("", this.slowThinkerOne.transform("Return This Later"));
    assertEquals("Return This Later", this.slowThinkerOne
            .transform("One More Time"));
    assertEquals("One More Time", this.slowThinkerOne.transform(""));
    assertEquals("", this.slowThinkerTwo.transform("This is the Last Time"));

Thanks so much!

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What is the problem? What is going wrong? –  uba Mar 12 '13 at 4:34
    
Is it the case that, given N inputs, you want N-1 inputs back (N > 0)? –  Makoto Mar 12 '13 at 4:35
2  
Might I point out that the array unnecessarily confuses things? You are only ever storing one value (the next one to return) and therefore only need one variable. –  Bill K Mar 12 '13 at 4:40
    
increment method could have been if(true){i++; return i;} instead of while(true). –  R.J Mar 12 '13 at 4:50
    
it could have just been return i++; for that matter. –  Colin Gillespie Mar 12 '13 at 4:52

2 Answers 2

You are calling increment() twice in your transform() method. You could fix it by storing the value in a temporary variable.

int val = increment();
sayings[val] = stringToTransform;
return sayings[val];
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That Worked! Thanks so much! –  Fdsa Fdsa Mar 12 '13 at 4:41

The antithesis of functional programming. The return value, instead of being based only on the arguments, is based only on the argument to a prior call.

public class SlowThinker {
    private String last = "";

    public String transform(String saying) {
        String response = last;
        last = saying;
        return response;
    }
}
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