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I need to write a web service in linux, Through a java program. The service provided should be a text file. Say whenever the client access the service, It should return a file say /tmp/sample.txt.

And the problem is, the client is a C# program which is running on the windows 7. And the linux will be running as Virtual machine in Windows.

What I need is:

  1. How can i host a service in linux which is written in java.

  2. How can i access it in windows client whch is a c# program.

I would be happy if anyone help me on this.

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It sounds like you've already got it figured it out, write the application in Java, run it on Linux. The Windows machine doesn't care what platform it's accessing via a web service, nor does C#. –  Nick Veys Mar 12 '13 at 5:27
    
@NickVeys: What steps i need to follow to host it as a service in linux? –  SeeEM Mar 12 '13 at 5:31
1  
Different distributions handle services or daemons differently. To be honest I'd simply Google "custom daemon <my linux distribution>" and go from there. –  Nick Veys Mar 12 '13 at 5:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can integrate Tomcat into Apache for hosting Java sites on Linux. Here is the site for Apache Tomcat: http://tomcat.apache.org/. Don't forget you will also need the JDK installed on the Linux server so that it can run Java programs.

Here's a site that can help you get started with it on a RedHat distribution of Linux: http://easylinuxtutorials.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/how-to-install-apache-tomcat-7-on.html

As long as it has an accessible URL, you can just make a call to the URL, then read the file either by saving it to a local directory and reading it off the downloaded file, or directly reading it into a file stream. Check How to read a file from internet?

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