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I want to replace the following reserved chars into spaces:

+ - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \

This is my code, but it doesn't work. Did I miss anything?

keyword = keyword.gsub(/\\+-&\\|!\\(\\)\\{\\}\\[\\]\\^"~\\*\\?:\\\\/, ' ')
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is what tr is for:

keyword.tr '-+&|!(){}[]^"~*?:\\', " "
#=> "                                   "
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What is the difference between gsub and tr? which is faster? Thanks! –  silent Mar 12 '13 at 5:43
    
I would guess that tr is faster (not enough to matter really) but you don't need to worry about escaping –  pguardiario Mar 12 '13 at 5:46
1  
+1 for going for tr. It's an unsung hero. tr is faster (not enough to matter really). Oh yeah? Check out the benchmark. :-) I haven't looked at the source code, but tr should translate into C code that is highly efficient and should map closely to instructions in the CPU, based on my days writing in assembly language. gsub is going to take a lot more instructions to implement, especially when the regular expression engine is involved. –  the Tin Man Mar 12 '13 at 12:26
    
yeah, this is a much better solution than mine. –  Peter Mar 12 '13 at 18:40

Here's a benchmark showing the speed difference between gsub and tr:

require 'benchmark'
require 'pp'

STR = '+ - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \\'
LONG_STR = STR * 1_000
N = 1_000

puts `ruby -v`

pp STR.gsub(/[+&|!(){}\[\]^"~*:?\\-]/, ' ')
pp STR.tr('-+&|!(){}[]^"~*?:\\', ' ')

Benchmark.bm(5) do |b|
  b.report('gsub') { N.times { LONG_STR.gsub(/[+&|!(){}\[\]^"~*:?\\-]/, ' ') } }
  b.report('tr') { N.times { LONG_STR.tr('+&|!(){}[]^"~*:?\\-', ' ') } }
end

And the output:

ruby 1.8.7 (2012-02-08 patchlevel 358) [universal-darwin12.0]
"                                   "
"                                   "
          user     system      total        real
gsub  13.300000   0.190000  13.490000 ( 13.524779)
tr     0.080000   0.010000   0.090000 (  0.090045)

ruby 1.9.3p392 (2013-02-22 revision 39386) [x86_64-darwin12.2.0]
"                                   "
"                                   "
            user     system      total        real
gsub   17.890000   0.040000  17.930000 ( 18.016657)
tr      0.270000   0.000000   0.270000 (  0.283021)

ruby 2.0.0p0 (2013-02-24 revision 39474) [x86_64-darwin12.2.0]
"                                   "
"                                   "
            user     system      total        real
gsub    7.310000   0.020000   7.330000 (  7.361403)
tr      0.140000   0.010000   0.150000 (  0.145816)

It's interesting that 1.8.7 out-performed 1.9.3. I suspect it's because of the addition of multibyte character support in 1.9+.

I've done several benchmarks with 2.0 and have been very happy with the speed improvements I've seen.

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\W = Any non-word character

>> keyword = '+ - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \\'
=> "+ - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ \" ~ * ? : \\"
>> keyword.gsub!(/\W/," ")
=> "                                   "
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does non-word mean non-latin chars? Does other language like Japanese/Chinese considered non-word? –  silent Mar 12 '13 at 5:50

Just do this.

keyword.gsub!(/[+\-&|!(){}\[\]^"~*?:\\]/, " ")

Check:

>> keyword = '+ - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \\'
=> "+ - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ \" ~ * ? : \\"
>> keyword.gsub!(/[+\-&|!(){}\[\]^"~*?:\\]/, " ")
=> "                                   "

Character classes (enclosed by []) are easier to reason about in this case. You need to escape - and [ and ] and \.

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If you put - at the beginning or the end of [] then you don't need to escape it. Also did you know that gsub! returns nil if there is no match? –  pguardiario Mar 12 '13 at 5:42

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