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I'm looking for a way to determine if the user has, via settings, enabled or disabled their push notifications for my application.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 89 down vote accepted

call enabledRemoteNotificationsTypes and check the mask.

ex:

UIRemoteNotificationType types = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] enabledRemoteNotificationTypes];
if (types == UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone) 
   // blah blah blah
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thanks for the quick reply –  Kevin Oct 8 '09 at 3:19
16  
iOS 5: This checks for what kind of push notifications the app uses regardless of weather the app is in your phone's notification center or not. I disabled push notifications for my app and still got types == 6. Upon disabling sound and alert style, I got types == UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone. –  quantumpotato Oct 19 '11 at 17:02
3  
As quantumpotato pointed out, this answer no longer handles all cases and isn't a complete solution. –  DBD Sep 17 '12 at 14:52
2  
What's going on with Apple? I wish I could hear their response on this issue. How can we develop great apps without knowing such basic info?? –  Oded Regev Mar 21 '13 at 11:59
1  
@kpower. no.. comparison to UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone with == is fine because it's equal to zero. –  Zac Bowling Apr 11 at 2:53

I can't comment (not enough reputation), but re: quantumpotato's issue:

Where types is given by

UIRemoteNotificationType types = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] enabledRemoteNotificationTypes];

one can use

if (types & UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert)

instead of

if (types == UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone) 

will allow you to check only whether notifications are enabled (and don't worry about sounds, badges, notification center, etc.). The first line of code (types & UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert) will return YES if "Alert Style" is set to "Banners" or "Alerts", and NO if "Alert Style" is set to "None", irrespective of other settings.

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this does not address quantumpotato's issue. He is not concerned with just alerts but pointing out that you cannot discern through enabledRemoteNotifications whether the user has toggled the Notification Center setting on or off. –  Joey Feb 21 '13 at 18:40
6  
My answer may not directly answer "how to determine if app is in Notification Center", but it does offer a way to check whether or not the user will receive notifications for your app, which I think is an answer in the spirit of the question. I don't think it is possible to check the former. –  Tim Arnold Feb 21 '13 at 21:13
1  
The trick of "if (types & UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert)" is very good. –  nembleton Jul 22 at 20:13
    
Make sure you understand why the trick works! Bitwise operators are very useful, and bitmasks are common in Cocoa. Check out stackoverflow.com/a/3427633/1148702 –  Tim Arnold Jul 22 at 20:33
    
+1 for remembering the bit-operations checking. –  mgarciaisaia Aug 8 at 14:41
UIRemoteNotificationType types = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] enabledRemoteNotificationTypes];
if (types & UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert)
    // blah blah blah
{
    NSLog(@"Notification Enabled");
}
else
{
    NSLog(@"Notification not enabled");
}

Here we get the UIRemoteNotificationType from UIApplication. It represents the state of push notification of this app in the setting, than you can check on its type easily

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2  
please explain what this code does, writing code does not simply answer the question. –  Batty Apr 22 at 15:41

To complete the answer, it could work something like this...

UIRemoteNotificationType types = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] enabledRemoteNotificationTypes];
switch (types) {
   case UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert:
   case UIRemoteNotificationTypeBadge:
       // For enabled code
       break;
   case UIRemoteNotificationTypeSound:
   case UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone:
   default:
       // For disabled code
       break;
}

edit: This is not right. since these are bit-wise stuff, it wont work with a switch, so I ended using this:

UIRemoteNotificationType types = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] enabledRemoteNotificationTypes];
UIRemoteNotificationType typesset = (UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert | UIRemoteNotificationTypeBadge);
if((types & typesset) == typesset)
{
    CeldaSwitch.chkSwitch.on = true;
}
else
{
    CeldaSwitch.chkSwitch.on = false;
}
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I considered (for my situation) sound notifications as not enabled (Since I require text to consider them enabled for my app functionality) –  pojomx Feb 21 '13 at 17:28

re:

this is correct

if (types & UIRemoteNotificationTypeAlert)

but following is correct too ! (as UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone is 0 )

if (types == UIRemoteNotificationTypeNone) 

see the following

NSLog(@"log:%d",0 & 0); ///false
NSLog(@"log:%d",1 & 1); ///true
NSLog(@"log:%d",1<<1 & 1<<1); ///true
NSLog(@"log:%d",1<<2 & 1<<2); ///true
NSLog(@"log:%d",(0 & 0) && YES); ///false
NSLog(@"log:%d",(1 & 1) && YES); ///true
NSLog(@"log:%d",(1<<1 & 1<<1) && YES); ///true
NSLog(@"log:%d",(1<<2 & 1<<2) && YES); ///true
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Your pseudo code is incomplete. What is types? –  CodaFi Oct 21 '12 at 4:13
5  
What do you think types is?? enabledRemoteNotificationTypes of course.. –  Remover Feb 1 '13 at 10:16

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