Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

similar question

My case is different. I've written an SSL client using boost::asio::ssl but presently have no server to test against as it's being developed by other group. So the present server only accepts plain TCP (insecure) connections. When i used my ssl client against the server, the blocking handshake() hangs/never returns. I've searched over the net and got that Mozilla also had similar issues - it hung when initiating SSL connection to a non-ssl supporting server, but their bug stands fixed. I'll just put explanations to parts of my code to make sure there's no coding error:

in ctor:

SecuredConnectionPolicy<ThreadPolicy>::SecuredConnectionPolicy() :
   m_sslContext(boost::asio::ssl::context::sslv23),
   m_socket(m_ioService, m_sslContext) //ssl::stream<tcp::socket>
{

}

then when my "connect(...)" is called:

   m_sslContext.set_options(boost::asio::ssl::context::default_workarounds);

   m_sslContext.set_verify_mode(
            boost::asio::ssl::context::verify_none,
            errorCode
            );

   if(!errorCode)
   {
      /*m_sslContext.set_verify_callback(
               [this](bool bIsPreverificationSuccessful, boost::asio::ssl::verify_context &context){return this->verificationHandler(bIsPreverificationSuccessful, context);},
               errorCode
               );*/

      if(!errorCode)
      {
         m_sslContext.load_verify_file("newcert.pem", errorCode);

         if(!errorCode)
         {
            m_socket.lowest_layer().connect(remoteEndpoint, errorCode);

            if(!errorCode)
            {  //    ########### Following NEVER RETURNS #############
               m_socket.handshake(boost::asio::ssl::stream_base::client, errorCode);

               if(errorCode)
               {
                  std::cerr << "Secured Connection Handshake Failed! " << errorCode.message() << std::endl;
               }
            }
            else
            {
               std::cerr << "Secured Connection Failed! " << errorCode.message() << std::endl;
            }
         }
         else
         {
            std::cerr << "Secured Connection loading certificate files from default paths Failed! " << errorCode.message() << std::endl;
         }
      }
      else
      {
         std::cerr << "Registering Verification callback failed! " << errorCode.message() << std::endl;
      }
   }
   else
   {
      std::cerr << "Secured Connection verify mode Failed! " << errorCode.message() << std::endl;
   }
  1. What could be the reason? Am i doing anything wrong?

  2. I'm not providing any verify_callback handler because i am assuming that preverification done by OpenSSL (because everywhere in boost it says it's calling OpenSSL equivalent function) should be enough. Is there any downside to it or could this affect <1>?

  3. This is a trivial one but just to make sure it does not cause problems: Generally examples in boost show that ssl context object has been set before giving it in ctor of ssl::stream<tcp::socket>. I however am giving it before (in the ctor above) and later changing properties in connect(). Would these be reflected in the behaviour of constructed ssl::stream (because it takes by reference and i hope it does not make any copies)?

On a side note (if it's useful), I created a CA rootKey, CA self-signed PEM certificate, Server certificate signed by CA certificate. CA certificate is what i'm giving to load_verify_file(...).

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You chose to invoke an operation that blocks until it completes or fails, it does neither, so it blocks forever. If you don't want to block as long as it takes for the operation to definitely succeed or fail, don't call an operation that's specifically documented to do just that.

If you did a blocking read on a connection where the other end never did a write, what would you expect to happen? It would block forever. Here, you've done a blocking handshake on a connection where the other end will never do a handshake with you. Your code waits until it does, just as you asked it to.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.