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I have a program, that in XCode, compiles and runs perfectly. It's actually one of apple's example programs for CoreAudio;

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#samplecode/PlayFile/Listings/PlayFile_cpp.html

The question I have is not directed specifically at this code, but is more general; I'd like to understand the compiling and linking process a bit better; XCode is making this a little abstract for me. I can't seem to understand what flags should be passed to make this compile, let alone why.

I understand that the headers aren't on the default build path, so clang needs to be told where they are; I used -I./PublicUtility and clang can now find the header files.

This application also links to the CoreAudio framework, so when an application uses code from a framework, is there anything different I need to do with the compiler compared to linking to a library?

( I know the distinction between library and framework Isn't clear : What is the major difference between a framework and a toolkit? )

Right now, In terms of trying to compile PlayFile, I have the command

clang++ PlayFile.cpp -I./PublicUtility -o playfile

I tried to signal the compiler to look for frameworks with -F and for libraries with -L (though if I'm reading this application's code right, it only links to frameworks, not to any libraries.

I have read the man pages and the documentation for the gnu compiler ( clang is gcc compatible, so flags passed to gcc should be compatible with clang? ) but again it all seems a little abstract from my perspective currently.

Can anyone provide insight into what flags need to be passed under what circumstances?

On the comment of another user, I've discovered what commands xcode uses to compile the program, however I'm still a little bit lost.

All of the commands the xcode issues are relative to a directory called ~/Library/Developer/Xcode/DerivedData I'm a little closer to understanding how xcode builds programs, but none of my source files are in this directory. How would I alter the arguments XCode supplies to the compiler to compile outside of XCode? Is this directory simply a holding place that XCode uses to contain object files before they are built into a program?

Some of the the arguments still I don't understand; whether or not they're neccesary to compile the application or even what they mean.

These ones which are listed before includes or frameworks are specified.

fmessage-length=0 -Wno-trigraphs -fpascal-strings -O0 -Wno-missing-field-initializers -Wno-missing-prototypes -Wreturn-type -Wno-implicit-atomic-properties -Wno-receiver-is-weak -Wno-non-virtual-dtor -Wno-overloaded-virtual -Wno-exit-time-destructors -Wformat -Wno-missing-braces -Wparentheses -Wswitch -Wno-unused-function -Wno-unused-label -Wno-unused-parameter -Wunused-variable -Wunused-value -Wno-empty-body -Wno-uninitialized -Wno-unknown-pragmas -Wno-shadow -Wno-four-char-constants -Wno-conversion -Wno-constant-conversion -Wno-int-conversion -Wno-enum-conversion -Wno-shorten-64-to-32 -Wno-newline-eof -Wno-selector -Wno-strict-selector-match -Wno-undeclared-selector -Wno-deprecated-implementations -Wno-c++11-extensions -fasm-blocks -fstrict-aliasing -Wprotocol -Wdeprecated-declarations -Winvalid-offsetof -g -fvisibility=hidden -fvisibility-inlines-hidden -Wno-sign-conversion

Wno-trigraphs and -Wno-c++11-extensions seem pretty self explanatory: Dont interpret trigraphs in the code and dont use c++11 extensions if I'm guessing correctly?

It would be silly to ask for a definition of all of these, but some, like -fpascal-strings, give no results on a quick google search. And none of this is even written in pascal!

Looking at the commands further;

-I/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Toolchains/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/include

is included 3 times in one command.

Are some of these basically extraneous, or am I missing some basic concept here?

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If you know of any good resources that cover compiling feel free to mention them, They may be able to help me understand this a bit better too. –  joshua.thomas.bird Mar 12 '13 at 7:37
1  
You can look at the commands issued by Xcode to help figure some of this out. For example you'll see the flags used for frameworks. –  bames53 Mar 12 '13 at 7:52
    
I just found the commands that get issued by Xcode, and some of it has helped; ie what files get compiled and what libraries/frameworks get linked to. But some of the arguments Xcode issues in these commands don't make much sense to me... Is there a resource that might explain some of this? –  joshua.thomas.bird Mar 12 '13 at 9:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Wno-trigraphs and -Wno-c++11-extensions seem pretty self explanatory: Dont interpret trigraphs in the code and dont use c++11 extensions if I'm guessing correctly?

Not quite. First, -W is a flag to enable (and disable) warnings, so you know these flags are just about warnings, not changing any compiler features. Secondly, no- is a prefix that causes the -W flag to disable the named warning whereas without this prefix it enables warnings. So these flags are disabling warnings that occur when you use trigraphs and C++11 extensions.

It would be silly to ask for a definition of all of these, but some, like -fpascal-strings, give no results on a quick google search. And none of this is even written in pascal!

There are two basic data structures for string data. They are named 'C strings' and 'Pascal strings' respectively after languages that used them, however the general strategy can be used outside those languages. A 'C string' is a string whose length is determined by a terminating null character. A 'Pascal string' is a string where the length is stored before the string data.

The -f flag controls compiler features and so -fpascal-strings enables an extension where you can specify that a string literal will be a pascal string instead of a c string. This extension to C and C++ typically looks like this:

char const *c = "\phello, world!";

The \p escape character designates the string literal as a pascal string, and the initial byte of the string will be the length of the string. In this case c[0] will be 13. One can manually create pascal strings as well, "\xDhello, world!", but this requires manual counting and the number must be updated when you change the string.

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Ok, so all of the arguments that begin with -w are configuring what warnings the compiler will diplay, and the ones with -f control the features enabled in the compiler. –  joshua.thomas.bird Mar 12 '13 at 16:45
    
Ive put the commands that xcode uses into a makefile, and I've been playing around with which ones I can change or delete and still have it compile. Hopefully I'll be understanding this better shortly! –  joshua.thomas.bird Mar 12 '13 at 16:53

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