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The output of my code is 0,0,0. I was expecting 0, -1 , 1 instead. What is the problem in the code ? Why can't I add or subtract seconds from a DateTime?

public static void main(String[]args){

    DateTime dt1 = new DateTime();    
    DateTime dt2 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt2 = dt1
    DateTime dt3 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt3 < dt1
    DateTime dt4 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt4 > dt1

    dt3.minusSeconds(10);
    dt4.plusSeconds(10);

    int result1 = dt1.compareTo(dt2);
    int result2 = dt1.compareTo(dt3);
    int result3 = dt1.compareTo(dt4);

    System.out.println("Results " + result1 + " , " + result2 + " , " + result3);

}
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attempting same code with MutableDateTime. API says DateTime is immutable. API - DateTime is thread-safe and immutable, provided that the Chronology is as well. All standard Chronology classes supplied are thread-safe and immutable. also read- joda-time.sourceforge.net/apidocs/org/joda/time/… –  Jedi Knight Mar 12 '13 at 8:17
    
With MutableDateTime you'd want to use add, not plus. –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '13 at 8:18
    
@JonSkeet - yes. But, I don't see a minusSeconds() like method in MutableDateTime. Why is this so ? How will I do minus now ? –  Jedi Knight Mar 12 '13 at 8:22
1  
Just call addSeconds(-10). Or ideally, avoid MutableDateTime entirely... –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '13 at 8:25
    
@JonSkeet - oh yes ! basic math. But, this gives negative time. Please see my answer for details. –  Jedi Knight Mar 12 '13 at 8:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

minusSeconds() returns a copy of your DateTime object.

You could try this:

public static void main(String[]args){

    DateTime dt1 = new DateTime();    
    DateTime dt2 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt2 = dt1
    DateTime dt3 = new DateTime(dt1).minusSeconds(10); // dt3 < dt1
    DateTime dt4 = new DateTime(dt1).plusSeconds(10); // dt4 > dt1

    int result1 = dt1.compareTo(dt2);
    int result2 = dt1.compareTo(dt3);
    int result3 = dt1.compareTo(dt4);

    System.out.println("Results " + result1 + " , " + result2 + " , " + result3);

}
share|improve this answer
    
yes got that fortega –  Jedi Knight Mar 12 '13 at 8:18

minusSeconds and plusSeconds returns a copy of the DateTime.

You need to re-assign your variables:

dt3 = dt3.minusSeconds(10);
dt4 = dt4.plusSeconds(10);
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DateTime is immutable. When you do dt3.minusSeconds(10);, then the DateTime object that dt3 refers to is not modified; instead, it returns a new DateTime object. Change your code to this:

dt3 = dt3.minusSeconds(10);
dt4 = dt4.plusSeconds(10);
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Edited the code in my question to take years into account instead of seconds (see below). This easily lets us see if we get -ve time when we do addYears( - Some big int ). We get a negative value which is okay mathematically, but is not used in real life.

public static void main(String[]args){

    DateTime dt1 = new DateTime();    
    DateTime dt2 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt2 = dt1
    DateTime dt3 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt3 < dt1
    DateTime dt4 = new DateTime(dt1); // dt4 > dt1
    MutableDateTime mdt1 = new MutableDateTime(dt1); // mdt1 = dt1
    mdt1.addYears(-10);

    dt3 = dt3.minusYears(10);
    dt4 = dt4.plusYears(10);

    int result1 = dt1.compareTo(dt2);
    int result2 = dt1.compareTo(dt3);
    int result3 = dt1.compareTo(dt4);

    System.out.println("Results " + result1 + " , " + result2 + " , " + result3);
    System.out.println("IMmutable is " + dt1);
    System.out.println("mutable is " + mdt1);

    mdt1.addYears(-10000);
    System.out.println("mutable is " + mdt1);


}
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1  
It's not at all clear why you've added this as an answer, and you haven't specified any output either. As for whether negative values are used in real life - they absolutely are. 10000 years ago is ~8000 BC... What's your point here? –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '13 at 9:12
    
Sorry. Output is as expected in the question. My mistake. I rarely come across negative times (eg. 10 hours ago) in real life and assumed that they won't be needed. –  Jedi Knight Mar 12 '13 at 9:38
2  
No, they're pretty common. For example, "I expect this authentication token to have been generated at most 10 minutes ago" or "I expect the user to be at least 18 years old, i.e. birthdate is less than "now - 18 years" –  Jon Skeet Mar 12 '13 at 9:41

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