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My usage of git has mostly been through an IDE to date and I'm having a bit of a nightmare with what I thought would be an easy thing.

On the remote server I have gitolite running which seems to be working fine, my local machine can connect to the server and perform simple tasks.

I have a repo on the server with the same name as the repo on my local however the local repo was created a long time before the server version.

After a lot of reading on SO it was recommended to clone the remote then push to the server. So:

$ git clone ***server***:***repo***
Cloning into ***repo***...
warning: You appear to have cloned an empty repository.

When I do this I get an encouraging message:

$ git push origin master
Counting objects: 4070, done.
Delta compression using up to 4 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (3737/3737), done.
Writing objects: 100% (4070/4070), 15.16 MiB | 588 KiB/s, done.
Total 4070 (delta 867), reused 0 (delta 0)
To ***server***:***repo***.git
 * [new branch]      master -> master
$

All looks good... however the files are not on the server?

Should I merge, what about rebase... this is where my knowledge completely falls apart. I've tried to read the git-scm documentation but I have to be honest.. it's way over my head and this seems like it should be such a simple thing to do.

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1  
I don't get. Why are you cloning from remote, from where did you get that information? Why aren't you just adding the remote repo reference with git remote add to your local and then doing a push? –  eis Mar 12 '13 at 8:30
2  
warning: You appear to have cloned an empty repository. is your key. –  jnovack Mar 12 '13 at 8:36
    
maybe this was wrong, I read a lot of conflicting info, now I have all files on my local, none on remote, perhaps 2 repos on my local... I'm so confused.. that's why I'm asking.... thanks for the response –  Alex Mar 12 '13 at 8:37
    
the only files on the server of any size are in the 'pack' directory which means nothing to me sadly –  Alex Mar 12 '13 at 8:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The server only contains a bare repository, i.e. no checkout. The files are only stored in the objetcs/ directory and the pack files you mention. What you can do to verify that the files are indeed there, is e.g. to create a new clone from the server on your local machine. Alternatively, on the server, you can do a

git ls-tree -r master

which should give you a list of all the files along with their mode and hashes.

EDIT: You'll want to read the chapter about Git on the server in the Pro Git book.

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1  
Correct. Also, it must be a bare repository as you're not allowed to push to branches being checked out. –  Nils Werner Mar 12 '13 at 8:59
    
nice! yes they are there!! what can I do with them now? –  Alex Mar 12 '13 at 8:59
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@Alex could you elaborate your question a bit. It's a repo. What do you expect to do with them? –  eis Mar 12 '13 at 9:07
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What do you mean by what can I do with them now??? The repository is on your server, and you can push and pull from it, collaborating with others. What more do you want? –  Michael Wild Mar 12 '13 at 9:07
2  
@Alex that's not how it works. If you want the files out of it, you'll have to do a checkout/clone. The files are only there in the internal repo format. That's what it means to have a bare repository, a repository that you can push to. Like said previously, you cannot push to branches that are checked out = having the actual files in the file system. –  eis Mar 12 '13 at 9:12

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