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I have a search box that hides all lines in a list that don't contain the entered text.

This worked great until the list became 10,000 lines long. One keystroke is fine but if the user types a several letter word, the function is iterated for each keypress.

What I want to do is to abandon any previous execution of the function if a new key is pressed.

The function is very simple, as follows:

    $("#search").keyup(function(e) {
       goSearch();
    });

function goSearch()
{
var searchString = $("#search").val().toLowerCase();
$(".lplist").each(function(index, element) {
    var row = "#row-" + element.id.substr(5);
        if ($(element).text().toLowerCase().indexOf(searchString,0) != -1)
    $(row).show();
    else
    $(row).hide();
});
}

Thanks

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Don't be mean, vote up some answers, at least Danack's, :-) –  antur123 Mar 12 '13 at 10:44
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can't directly. Javascript is not multi-threaded so your function will run and block any key-presses until it is done.

The way this is made tolerable from a user-experience point of view is to not trigger a function immediately on a key event, but to wait a short period of time and then fire the event.

While the user is typing, the timeout function will continually be set and reset and so the gosearch function won't be called, and so the user won't have their typing interrupted.

When the user pauses typing, the timeout will countdown to zero and call the search function, which will run and block typing until it completes. But that's okay (so long as it completes within a second or so) as the user is probably not currently trying to type.

You can also do what you actually asked by breaking up your gosearch function into chunks, where each call to the function: * Reads a counter of the number of lines processed so far, and then processes another 500 lines and increments the counter. * Calls another gosearch using setTimeout with a value of zero for the time. This yields events to other 'threads', and allows for fast changing of search terms.

var goSearchTimeout = null;
var linesSearched = 0;

function keySearch(e){
    if(goSearchTimeout != null){
        clearTimeout(goSearchTimeout);
        linesSearched = 0;
    }
    goSearchTimeout = setTimeout(goSearch, 500);
}

$("#search").keyup(keySearch);

function highLight(index, element) {

    if(index >= linesSearched){
        var row = "#row-" + element.id.substr(5);
        if ($(element).text().toLowerCase().indexOf(searchString,0) != -1){
        $(row).show();
    else{
        $(row).hide();
    }
    if(index > linesSearched + 500){
        linesSearched = index;
        goSearchTimeout = setTimeout(goSearch);
        return;
    }
}

function goSearch(){
    goSearchTimeout = null;
    var searchString = $("#search").val().toLowerCase();
    $(".lplist").each(highLight);
}

If you're going to use timeout callbacks like this, I'd strongly recommend wrapping your code up into jQuery widgets, so that you can use variables on the object to store the variables goSearchTimeout etc rather than having them float around as global variables.

share|improve this answer
    
this is just wrong –  Gung Foo Mar 12 '13 at 8:57
1  
How is it wrong? –  Danack Mar 12 '13 at 8:58
    
javascript IS multithreaded, that is why you got an event system –  Gung Foo Mar 12 '13 at 8:58
    
No it's not stackoverflow.com/questions/1663125/is-javascript-multithreaded Which is why you shouldn't write long running functions. –  Danack Mar 12 '13 at 8:59
    
point taken! i found this: garrickcheung.com/javascript/… –  Gung Foo Mar 12 '13 at 9:03
show 1 more comment

Introduce a counter var keypressCount that is being increased by your keypress event handler. at the start of goSearch() write its value into a buffer. Then at each run of your $(".lplist").each() you ask if the current keypressCount is the same as the buffered one; if not, you return. I would suggest you use a for() though since it is easier to break; than $.each().

Update: You will have to make sure that there is time for new keypress events to be fired/received, so wrap the anonymous function of your $.each() inside a timeout.

Reference: http://www.garrickcheung.com/javascript/what-i-learned-about-multi-threading-in-javascript/

share|improve this answer
    
Smart thought, but it will not work, as JavaScript is single threaded. When goSearch() is called, nothing else will be executed until it exits. So, the keypressCount variable will not be updated until goSearch() finishes its execution, even if the keypress event happened during goSearch() execution. –  antur123 Mar 12 '13 at 8:47
    
it will be smarter if keypressCount is a global variable. read up on scopes if you must. :) –  Gung Foo Mar 12 '13 at 8:53
    
I don't get your point... –  antur123 Mar 12 '13 at 9:01
    
you can manipulate a global variable (declared outside of a function) from inside any function and it will keep it's value even after the function returns. –  Gung Foo Mar 12 '13 at 9:04
    
Sure, but variable will not be updated until function finishes its execution, as JavaScript is single-threaded. That is why your solution does not work. –  antur123 Mar 12 '13 at 9:06
show 1 more comment

You can use a global variable to save search string and stop execution when search string changes.

IMPORTANT: You must set a timeout in each iteration so that function execution is paused and global variables are updated, as JavaScript is single-threaded.

Your code would look like this:

var searchString;

$("#search").keyup(function(e) {
    // Update search string
    searchString = $("#search").val().toLowerCase();

    // Get items to be searched
    var items = $(".lplist");

    // Start searching!
    goSearch(items, searchString, 0);
});

function goSearch(items, filter, iterator)
{
    // Exit if search changed
    if (searchString != filter) {
        return;
    }

    // Exit if there are no items left
    if (iterator >= items.length) {
        return;
    }

    // Main logic goes here
    var element = items[iterator];
    var row = "#row-" + element.id.substr(5);
    if ($(element).text().toLowerCase().indexOf(filter, 0) != -1)
        $(row).show();
    else
        $(row).hide();

    // Schedule next iteration in 5 ms (tune time for better performance)
    setTimeout(function() {
        goSearch(items, filter, iterator + 1);
    }, 5);
}
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