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I want to create a trigger so that whenever I make a change (Update or Delete) it should copy the old data to a new table (with same template).

I tried this code:

create table restrictions(ID int,name text);

insert into restrictions values(122,'suresh');

select * from restrictions;

create table restrictions_deleted(ID int,name text);// this is my duplicate table for keeping information of all updations.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION moveDeleted() RETURNS trigger AS $$
    BEGIN
       INSERT INTO restrictions_deleted VALUES(OLD.ID, OLD.name);
       RETURN OLD;
    END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;


CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER moveDeleted
BEFORE DELETE ON restrictions 
FOR EACH ROW
EXECUTE PROCEDURE moveDeleted();

delete from restrictions where ID=122;
select * from restrictions_deleted;

This code is capable of recording all the deleted data into duplicate table. But I want to do same for updates also.

Any suggestion, any idea?

share|improve this question
    
And you're sure you want to replicate a whole table on an update operation? Have you considered to use a data model which records the historic information you need to know? –  Class Stacker Mar 12 '13 at 9:35
    
@ClassStacker The current trigger wont replicate whole table. It will only cope the current row. –  Igor Romanchenko Mar 12 '13 at 10:00
    
@IgorRomanchenko Absolutely. My fault. –  Class Stacker Mar 12 '13 at 10:06
    
@ClassStacker Please let me know if there is some more effective alternative as you said above. –  Patrick Mar 12 '13 at 10:13
    
It really all depends on your requirements (plus the specific data model you have chosen for your solution) and your infrastructure. But as @IgorRomanchenko pointed out, I... erm... read your post too quickly before I made the above comment. Still, I often end up marking records as deleted or expired if I want historic information. Storage space, performance, and access to historic information are key factors for the decision. –  Class Stacker Mar 12 '13 at 10:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First - in a trigger function you need to RETURN NEW; instead of RETURN OLD;.

Second - change the trigger to BEFORE DELETE OR UPDATE.

Last - it is better to have AFTER DELETE OR UPDATE for a logging trigger. This way it wont do useless work, when the change is rolled back.

BTW here is a good example of logging/audit trigger.

UPDATE:

The function will look like:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION moveDeleted() RETURNS trigger AS $$
    BEGIN
    IF (TG_OP = 'UPDATE') THEN
        INSERT INTO restrictions_deleted VALUES(OLD.ID, OLD.name);
        RETURN NEW;
    ELSIF (TG_OP = 'DELETE') THEN
        INSERT INTO restrictions_deleted VALUES(OLD.ID, OLD.name);
        RETURN OLD;
    END IF;
    END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
share|improve this answer
    
i worked with this what you told, however i want both update and delete with the same trigger.kindly provide a suggestion –  Patrick Mar 12 '13 at 11:28
    
@user2160090 The AFTER DELETE OR UPDATE will work with both UPDATE and DELETE. Read the manual here for fusher information. –  Igor Romanchenko Mar 12 '13 at 11:31
    
however i tried but not working for both,if using the code for update means we have to give NEW, for delete we have to give as OLD, how to give the both using trigger. please refer the code as given above function. –  Patrick Mar 12 '13 at 11:45
    
@user2160090 See my edit to the ansver. –  Igor Romanchenko Mar 12 '13 at 15:04
    
i tried it is working so good, thank you so much for the quick response –  Patrick Mar 13 '13 at 4:41

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