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In the program hereafter, I have a class animal, that has derived classes cat and dog with the same public functions but different private functions. I would like to let the user decide during runtime which animal is being created. I have made a simple example that shows what I approximately want, but which obviously doesn't work. I don't know how to solve this and would like to have your help.

#include <cstdio>

class canimal
{
  public:
    int sound()
    {
      std::printf("...\n");
      return 0;
    }
};

class cdog : public canimal
{
  public:
    int sound()
    {
      std::printf("Woof!\n");
      return 0;
    }
};

class ccat : public canimal
{
  public:
    int sound()
    {
      std::printf("Mieau!\n");
      return 0;
    }
};

int main()
{
  canimal *animal;
  cdog    *dog;

  // I would like to let the user decide here which animal will be made
  // In this case, I would like the function to say "Woof!", but of course it doesn't...
  animal = new cdog;
  animal->sound();

  // Here it works, but I would like the pointer to be of the generic class
  // such that the type of animal can be chosen at runtime
  dog    = new cdog;
  dog->sound();

  return 0;
}
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1  
As the below answers already discussing that you should make sound() as virtual. Also note that since you are doing dynamic allocation using new, you must have a virtual ~canimal() destructor as well. –  iammilind Mar 12 '13 at 9:25
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3 Answers

You need to make the sound() method virtual:

class canimal
{
  public:
    virtual int sound()
    ^^^^^^^

This will make it behave exactly as you need.

For further discussion, see Can someone explain C++ Virtual Methods?

In C++ 11 there is a new override keyword that, when used appropriately, makes certain types of errors less likely. See Safely override C++ virtual functions

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I think you are looking to make sound() virtual. Read up on polymorphism in C++.

class canimal
{
  public:
    virtual int sound()
    {
      std::printf("...\n");
      return 0;
    }
};
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add comment

You need to use virtual

i.e.

class canimal
{
  public:
    virtual int sound()
    {
      std::printf("...\n");
      return 0;
    }
};

class cdog : public canimal
{
  public:
    virtual int sound()
    {
      std::printf("Woof!\n");
      return 0;
    }
};

class ccat : public canimal
{
  public:
    virtual int sound()
    {
      std::printf("Mieau!\n");
      return 0;
    }
};
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Thank you, I guess if I don't want to introduce another level of inheritance, I do not need to make the derived functions virtual? –  Chiel Mar 12 '13 at 9:28
    
You could also make canimal a pure virtual function so that only derived objects can be created. This is done by virtual in sound() = 0; –  Ed Heal Mar 12 '13 at 9:48
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