Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a partial specialization for template class method?

 template <class A, class B>
 class C
 {
  void foo();
 }

it doesn't work to specialize it like this:

template <class A> void C<A, CObject>::foo() {};

Any help?

share|improve this question
    
There are a couple of ways shown on other answers: stackoverflow.com/questions/1501357/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 8 '09 at 15:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you are already have specialized class you could give different implementation of foo in specialized class:

template<typename A, typename B>
class C
{
public:
    void foo() { cout << "default" << endl; };
};

template<typename A>
class C<A, CObject>
{
public:
  void foo() { cout << "CObject" << endl; };
};


To specialize member function in Visual C++ 2008 you could make it template too:

template<typename A, typename B>
class C
{
  template<typename T>
  void foo();

  template<>
  void foo<CObject>();
};

The solution above seems to will be available only in future C++ Standard (according to draft n2914 14.6.5.3/2).

share|improve this answer
    
While the second is correct, the first is wrong - you cannot put explicit specializations in class scope - and even if you put the specialization of the template in namespace scope - if you specialize a template, then all its enclosing templates have to be specialized too :( So you have to stick with the second way. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 8 '09 at 15:37
    
So this won't work for example: template<typename A, typename B> template<> void C<A, B>::foo<CObject>() { }, because while the member function template is specialized, the outer one isn't yet. You could do the other way around though template<> template<typename T> void C<int, bool>::foo() { } but i suspect this isn't what he wants to do -.- –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 8 '09 at 15:44
    
First seems to be not C++03 Standard compliant, but it works in Visual C++ 2008. It looks like C++0x extension (14.6.5.3 Members of class template specializations). –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 8 '09 at 18:00
    
Fixed answer, second option still there for reference. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 8 '09 at 18:06
    
Well the example in 14.6.5.3/2 in the c++0x draft is a partial specialization. For partial specializations, those restrictions aren't in place. Those can be put in class scope - already in c++03. But in your case, you explicitly specialize the function template. If they had done this in their example, it would be illegal aswell: template<class T> struct A { template<class T2> struct B {}; template<> struct B<int*> {}; }; . There is an issue report at open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_closed.html#727 asking for lifting this restriction (which i would welcome too, of course) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 8 '09 at 18:39

I think there is a misunderstanding there.

There are two kinds of templates:

  • the template classes
  • the template methods

In your example, you have a template class, which of course contains some methods. In this case, you will have to specialize the class.

template <class A>
class C<A,CObject>
{
  void foo() { ... } // specialized code
};

The problem in your example is relatively simple: you define the method foo for the specialization C but this specialization has never been declared beforehand.

The problem here is that you have to fully specialize your C class (and thus copying a lot of data). There are a number of workarounds.

  • Inheritance (Composition ?): do all the common work in a base class, then have the C class inherits and specialize as appropriate
  • Friend: instead of having the 'foo' method being a member of C, define it as a friend free functions and specialize only this method
  • Delegation: have your 'foo' method call another method 'bar', which is a free function, and specialize 'bar' appropriately

Which in code gives:

// 1- Inheritance
template <class A, class B>
class CBase
{
  // Everything that does not require specialization
};

template <class A, class B>
class C: public CBase<A,B>
         // depending on your need, consider using another inheritance
         // or even better, composition
{
  void foo(); // generic
};

template <class A>
class C<A,CObject> : public CBase<A,CObject>
{
  void foo(); // specialized
};

// 2- Friend
// note the change in signature:
// - now you need to pass the attributes to be changed
// - the last parameter helps differentiating the overload
//   as there is no specialization for functions
template <class A, class B> void foo(Arg1&, Arg2&, const B&);
template <class A> void foo(Arg1&, Arg2&, const CObject&);

template <class A, class B>
class C
{
  friend template <class, class> foo;
};

// 3- Delegation
// same signature as foo in (2)
template <class A, class B> void bar(Arg1&, Arg2&, const B&);
template <class A> void bar(Arg1&, Arg2&, const CObject&);

template <class A, class B>
class C
{
  void foo() { bar(member1, member2, B()); }
};

Hope it clarifies, and helps!

share|improve this answer

Since the class is the template, you need to specialize that:

template <class A>
class C<A, CObject> 
{
   void foo() { ... }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I already specialized class, but I exactly need to specialize method :) –  faya Oct 8 '09 at 5:53

No, there is no partial function template specialization in C++0x to be added.

As correctly mentioned above, with regards to function templates basically 2 things were done:

  • default template arguments were made available;
  • variadic templates were introduced.

So as before, workarounds should be used to "emulate" partial function templates specialization.

share|improve this answer

If I remember correctly, you cannot make partial template specialization for functions. Not sure whether it is included in C++0X

Update: (Awaiting confirmation) As noted in the comments, partial template specialization of functions is possible in C++0X.

share|improve this answer
    
This restriction is lifted on C++0x –  the_drow Oct 8 '09 at 5:59
    
@yngvedh, have you got a reference for that "Update:" note? I haven't heard of this yet. Afaik, they just liften default arguments - i.e you can have default arguments in function templates. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 8 '09 at 15:39
    
@libt, no reference. I just assumed the_drow knew what he was talking about as I'm no expert on C++0X. Can anyone in the know confirm this? I'll update appropriately. –  Yngve Hammersland Oct 8 '09 at 19:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.