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I'm a bit surprised that modules for the Linux kernel are so "fragile" and need re-compilation so often. Using the same source tree on two different machines (e.g. different version of gcc) produce modules (machine A) that do not work with the kernel (machine B).

Adding a dummy system call apparently also require a re-compilation if I don't want an infamous no symbol version for module_layout error message.

What surprises me even more is that adding a mere .c file in kernel/, that do not touch any ABI (i.e. a standalone function, that is not exported, used or updates whatever internal structure).

Adding a dummy text string in that new .c file let all the modules untouched.

So what exactly is the rule and the rationale here ? (I'm focusing on x86, 32-bit architecture, if that matters)

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Not an answer since it is just a guess. Basically, modules need to know where an exported function reside in kernel. Kernel is a bit module which may be changed during recompilation. If you compile exactly the same code with exactly the same flags, you get the same module, so exports are unmodified. Otherwise modules break. Comments in files get removed before actual compilation and thus inflict no changes. –  Aneri Mar 12 '13 at 11:11
    
do you mean that there is no symbol resolution against a table that would sit in the kernel itself ? –  sylvainulg Mar 12 '13 at 12:18
    
Nope, it is done during linking of modules with kernel. No runtime resolving, like in DLLs. –  Aneri Mar 13 '13 at 11:31

1 Answer 1

You seem overly focused on the compile aspect of rebuilding the kernel and (loadable) modules, and forgetting about linking. I suspect that you may be exaggerating when you state that a "re-compilation" is required.

What surprises me even more is that adding a mere .c file in kernel/, that do not touch any ABI (i.e. a standalone function, that is not exported, used or updates whatever internal structure)

When you add a .c file (aka source module) to the kernel, that newly compiled object file will require building a new kernel image using the linker. Since there is no evaluation of which global kernel symbols moved or did not move, consequently all (loadable) modules would have to be rebuilt (actually only relinked) with the new symbol map. A "recompilation" of all kernel modules is not necessary; just the .o object files have to be rebuilt into loadable modules using the new kernel symbol map.

To ensure that a (loadable) module is executing with its matching kernel & symbol map, versioning and build information are validated when the kernel module is loaded. What you call "fragile" is actually a security measure to ensure the integrity of the code that is executed in privileged mode.

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thanks for the clarification, and yup, I should have used "re-built" rather than "re-compiled" as I had not checked which steps were applied on those modules, simply that modules generated at the previous "make modules" would no longer load. –  sylvainulg Mar 13 '13 at 13:44

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