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I have come across some code that is intended to replace an object in-place without reallocation of memory:

static void move(void* const* src, void** dest) {
   (*reinterpret_cast<T**>(dest))->~T();
   **reinterpret_cast<T**>(dest) = **reinterpret_cast<T* const*>(src);
}

This looks like UB to me, since the object is destroyed and then assigned to without being constructed, i.e. it needs to either just copy-assign (the second line only) or explicitly destruct (the first line) followed by placement-new copy construction instead of the assignment.

I only ask because although this seems like a glaring bug to me, it has existed for some time in both boost::spirit::hold_any and the original cdiggins::any on which it is based. (I have asked about it on the Boost developers mailing list, but while awaiting responses wish to fix this locally if it is indeed incorrect.)

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where did I put my goggles? –  CyberSpock Mar 12 '13 at 11:46
    
I know, bit of an eyeful isn't it. I would've simplified, but felt that the context of the original code and its purpose could've been relevant to the answer :) –  boycy Mar 12 '13 at 12:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming the reinterpret_casts are well-defined (that is, dest really is a pointer to pointer to T), the standard defines the end of an object's lifetime as:

The lifetime of an object of type T ends when:

  • if T is a class type with a non-trivial destructor (12.4), the destructor call starts, or
  • the storage which the object occupies is reused or released.

It then gives some restrictions over what can be done with the glvalue **reinterpret_cast<T**>(dest):

Similarly, [...] after the lifetime of an object has ended and before the storage which the object occupied is reused or released, any glvalue that refers to the original object may be used but only in limited ways. [...] The program has undefined behavior if:

  • an lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1) is applied to such a glvalue,
  • the glvalue is used to access a non-static data member or call a non-static member function of the object, or
  • the glvalue is implicitly converted (4.10) to a reference to a base class type, or
  • the glvalue is used as the operand of a static_cast (5.2.9) except when the conversion is ultimately to cv char& or cv unsigned char&, or
  • the glvalue is used as the operand of a dynamic_cast (5.2.7) or as the operand of typeid.

Emphasis added.

If the object doesn't end up in this after-life state because it has a trivial destructor, there is no problem. However, for any T which is a class type with non-trivial destructor, we know that the assignment operator is considered a member function operator= of that class. Calling a non-static member function of the object through this glvalue results in undefined behaviour.

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The reinterpret_casts are indeed valid; hold_any is a type-erased value wrapper and ensures type-safety throughout. (Edit: itchy trigger finger) I take from your standard quote (thanks) that for a generic implementation with unknown T, the assignment cannot be assumed to be valid, and a valid object should be in-place constructed before any of the listed operations can validly take place. If that is the case then a straightforward copy-assignment without the destructor call seems more sensible to me. –  boycy Mar 12 '13 at 11:42
    
@boycy I agree with everything you said. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 12 '13 at 11:50

This looks like UB to me, since the object is destroyed and then assigned to without being constructed, i.e. it needs to either just copy-assign (the second line only) or explicitly destruct (the first line) followed by placement-new copy construction instead of the assignment.

There is no need to fix anything, although this code is certainly not safe without further qualification (it's certain to be safe in the context where it's used though).

The object at dest is destroyed, and then the memory backing the object at src is copied over to where the object at dest used to live. End result: you have destroyed one object and placed a shallow clone of another object where the first one used to live.

If you only do the copy assignment the first object will not have been destructed, resulting in resource leaks.

Using placement new to populate the memory at dest would be an option, but it has very different semantics than the existing code (creates a brand new object instead of making a shallow clone of an existing one). Placement new and using the copy constructor also has different semantics: the object needs to have an accessible copy constructor, and you are no longer in control of what the result will be (the copy constructor does whatever it wants).

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> If you only do the copy assignment the first object will not have been destructed, resulting in resource leaks. If you copy-assign one object to another, the destination doesn't get destroyed then copy-constructed, so why should it here? This explicit destructor call isn't matched by any subsequent constructor call. It's easy enough to create a test that results in a copy scenario having one more destruction than construction (though requires this hold_any bug to be fixed first). –  boycy Mar 12 '13 at 11:40
    
@boycy: The destination gets destroyed when its lifetime ends, which is not when the copy assignment happens. This code decides unilaterally that the lifetime of the object at dest shall end right now, and that's why it calls the destructor. Obviously if e.g. you call the destructor on an object with automatic storage duration you will get double destruction when it goes out of scope, but that's your fault. This code "knows" that it's safe to destroy whatever dest is going to be passed to it. –  Jon Mar 12 '13 at 11:50
    
Indeed - and I think that is the bug, though that does require knowledge of the context from which this code is called. To highlight part of the question, this is "code that is intended to replace an object in-place without reallocation of memory"; this code is not replacing the original valid object with another, but leaves it in a potentially-valid state dependent on T. –  boycy Mar 12 '13 at 12:55
    
@boycy: I believe we are thinking about the same concept, although in that case I don't like the description "leaves it in a potentially valid state". In my book, object == instance and since the destructor is run one object is replaced by another (the caller assumes responsibility that the new object will manage being placed in the old one's shoes). While it seems that you have in mind object == storage location. Since we know nothing about that location you could say that simply the object's state is changed, but it seems wrong to me. –  Jon Mar 12 '13 at 13:22
    
You're right, that was shabby wording on my part. I should've said the storage location was left in an unknown state. When you say "since the destructor is run one object is replaced by another (the caller assumes responsibility that the new object will manage being placed in the old one's shoes)." are you implying the assignment operator would construct the object to which it is supposed to be assigning first? That would be a surprising allocation of responsibility. Of course if the assignment operator is a member of T then we've already lost as per @sftrabbit's answer. –  boycy Mar 12 '13 at 14:10

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