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For example, I have spectrum for guitar note D and I have spectrum for guitar note F. How to get spectrum of both of them? How to create chord spectrum?

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5  
Just sum the power spectra (magnitude of FFT) and don't worry about the phase. –  Paul R Mar 12 '13 at 11:54
3  
Paul is correct, assuming that both spectra are on the same scale. –  David K Mar 12 '13 at 13:43
    
Thank you. Should I normalize result after adding? When two people are playing the same note at the same time in a room, it does not sound twice as loud. –  varan Mar 12 '13 at 17:34

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

When the data in the FFT is represented as Real and Imaginary components (this is the usual result of the FFT), just add the two together.

Adding the FFTs is just like adding the waveforms, which is what a chord would sound like.

If your FFT data is represented as Magnitude and Phase, you would need to convert back to the Real and Imaginary representation before doing the addition.

Also, in the comments, people have suggested that you can just add the magnitudes. The result of this will be a very different waveform than if you were to add the actual waveforms (like in playing an actual chord), or the FFTs, but the idea behind this is that the ear is completely insensitive to phase. I don't think this is true, and it's no easier than directly adding the FFTs, so why make this approximation? The only reason I could see is if you actually only have the spectra (typically meaning the FFT magnitude), but if you actually have the FFTs, I'd just add them. If you do add the spectra, make sure you're not looking at the square (which is typically what would be meant by power spectra), or log, etc, but the actual magnitude.

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Should I normalize result after adding? –  varan Mar 12 '13 at 17:26
    
When two people are playing the same note at the same time in a room, it does not sound twice as loud. –  varan Mar 12 '13 at 17:33
1  
No, you shouldn't normalize, though it probably won't make a big difference. Two people playing doesn't sound twice as loud because loudness is actually logarithmic with amplitude -- that is, doubling the amplitude of the sound does not double the loudness, but this is about how the ear works, not how sound works. –  tom10 Mar 12 '13 at 17:46
    
Thank you very much! –  varan Mar 14 '13 at 7:42

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