Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am stuck for last 4 days in an algorithm. I am working on Mahjong Safari type game (http://www.pogo.com/games/mahjongsafari), and I want to develop path between two tiles with least number of tiles.

I already applied A* algorithm with Manhattan Hueristic, but that generates shortest path with lots of turns. There is no need of shortest path, I just need path with min turns (preferably 2). Below is image from Mahjong Safari game, which generates path between 2 tiles. You will notice that the path from A to B and path from B to A are different.

enter image description here

Please help me, in any code or any algorithm name or any logic you think could work.

EDIT: The Solution I applied for this:

I used genuine A* Algorithm first to find shortest path, and I used Manhattan distance as heuristic goal estimate. To straighten the path more, and choose path with least number of turns, i used following tactic in each iteration:

Tile first = currentNode.parent;
Tile curr  = currentNode;
Tile last  = successorOfCurrentNode;
if (first != null)
{
    if ((first.X == curr.X && first.Y != curr.Y) && (curr.Y == last.Y && curr.X != last.X))
    {
        // We got turn
    currentNode.Cost += 10;
    currentNode.calcuateTotalCost();

        successorOfCurrentNode.Cost += 5;
    successorOfCurrentNode.calcuateTotalCost();
    }
    else if ((first.X != curr.X && first.Y == curr.Y) && (curr.X == last.X && curr.Y != last.Y))
    {
        // We got turn
    currentNode.Cost += 10;
    currentNode.calcuateTotalCost();

        successorOfCurrentNode.Cost += 5;
    successorOfCurrentNode.calcuateTotalCost();
    }

}

share|improve this question
2  
This isn't really a programming question. You should probably post this question in http://math.stackexchange.com/ –  David K Mar 12 '13 at 12:26
    
You could try adding a turning cost to your heuristic. Also, see this post. –  mbeckish Mar 12 '13 at 12:48
    
@mbeckish You are right about turning cost, I will try it. –  GamyGuru Mar 12 '13 at 13:00
3  
@DavidK - I couldn't disagree more. How can a question about an algorithm needed for a program not be a programming question? –  mbeckish Mar 12 '13 at 13:08
    
@mbeckish - This question is specifically being asked without even referencing a language. If there's no language to write code, and you are purely working with an algorithm, at that point it has become math. It was my understanding that this forum was for specific programming questions, though I concede that you have much more experience here than me. –  David K Mar 12 '13 at 13:16
show 8 more comments

3 Answers 3

You could use Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, but in every node you should not only store the shortest path, but also the direction of that path, so you know whether you need to increase the count.

Thinking a little more, I guess you would need to store all shortest paths with their direction in every node, in order to pick the best one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Huester for the comments, actually I used A* and computed all paths and then searched for least turns path, but problem is that it takes too long to compute and my game hangs while computation. –  GamyGuru Mar 12 '13 at 12:59
add comment

Your problem is more simple than using a heuristic, since you don't need expectation, but it can enhance the speed of finding the optimal in case your search is not "complete" .. but rather you just want the path with minimal turns, hence you can go with Greedy Search where:

h(A) > h(B) ~ turns(A) < turns(B)

h* = MIN(turns(x))

h(x): heuristic of path X

turns(x): number of turns in path X

h*: highest possible heuristic, path with minimum number of turns

Here is a simple code in Java that illustrate:

class TileGame
{
    // example of a game board
    int [][] matrix = new int [10][10];

    // return possible next-state
    public ArrayList<Path> next (Path p)
    {
        // based on your rules, you decide valid transitions
        ArrayList<Path> n = new ArrayList<Path>();
        ArrayList<Point> t = new ArrayList<Point>();

        // add up, down, right, and left
        t.add(new Point(p.current.x+1, p.current.y));
        t.add(new Point(p.current.x-1, p.current.y));
        t.add(new Point(p.current.x, p.current.y+1));
        t.add(new Point(p.current.x, p.current.y-1));

        // don't allow going back to previous tile, cause infinite loops
        t.remove(p.previous);

        for (Point i : t)
        {
            if (i.x == p.current.x == p.previous.x || i.y == p.current.y == p.previous.y)
                n.add(new Path(i, p.current, p.turns));
            else
                n.add(new Path(i, p.current, p.turns+1));
        }

        return n;
    }

    // ..

}

private class Path
{
    public Point current, previous;
    public int turns;

    public Path(Point curr, Point prev, int tur)
    {
        current = curr;
        previous = prev;
        turns = tur;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The Solution I applied for this:

I used genuine A* Algorithm first to find shortest path, and I used Manhattan distance as heuristic goal estimate. To straighten the path more, and choose path with least number of turns, i used following tactic in each iteration:

enter code here

Tile first = currentNode.parent;
Tile curr  = currentNode;
Tile last  = successorOfCurrentNode;
if (first != null)
{
    if ((first.X == curr.X && first.Y != curr.Y) && (curr.Y == last.Y && curr.X != last.X))
    {
        // We got turn
        currentNode.Cost += 10;
        currentNode.calcuateTotalCost();

        successorOfCurrentNode.Cost += 5;
        successorOfCurrentNode.calcuateTotalCost();
    }
    else if ((first.X != curr.X && first.Y == curr.Y) && (curr.X == last.X && curr.Y != last.Y))
    {
        // We got turn
        currentNode.Cost += 10;
        currentNode.calcuateTotalCost();

        successorOfCurrentNode.Cost += 5;
        successorOfCurrentNode.calcuateTotalCost();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.