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I have an object presented as a reference/pointer to an interface. I would like to call a method on the concrete object if that method is present, without changing the interface, breaking encapsulation, or writing any horrible hacks. How can it be done?

Here's an example.

I have an interface:

class IChatty
{
public:
    virtual ~IChatty() {};
    virtual std::string Speak() const = 0;
};

And multiple concrete implementation of this interface:

class SimpleChatty : public IChatty
{
public:
    ~SimpleChatty() {};

    virtual std::string Speak() const override
    {
        return "hello";
    }
};

class SuperChatty : public IChatty
{
public:
    void AddToDictionary(const std::string& word)
    {
        words_.insert(word);
    }
    virtual std::string Speak() const override
    {
        std::string ret;
        for(auto w = words_.begin(); w != words_.end(); ++w )
        {
            ret += *w;
            ret += " ";
        }
        return ret;
    }
private:
    std::set<std::string> words_;
};

The SuperChatty::AddToDictionary method is not present in the abstract IChatty interface, although it could be included in another, new interface.

In the real world, these objects are constructed through factories, themselves concrete instantiations of an abstract interface. However for our purposes that's orthogonal to the problem at hand:

int main()
{
    IChatty* chatty = new SuperChatty;
    chatty->AddToDictionary("foo");
    std::cout << chatty->Speak() << std::endl;
}

Since AddToDictionary isn't part of the IChatty interface (and can't be part of it), I can's call it.

How can I call AddToDictionary on the chatty pointer without breaking encapsulation, writing some horrible hack, or taking any other design shortcuts?

NOTE: In the real world, the dictionary is part of the SuperChatty object itself, and cannot be separate from it.

NOTE2: I do not want to downcast to the concrete type.

share|improve this question
2  
dynamic_cast is your friend. –  Snps Mar 12 '13 at 12:40
5  
@snipes83 Er... no it's not. –  Peter Wood Mar 12 '13 at 12:41
1  
@snipes83: If you mean something like, dynamic_cast<SuperChatty*>(chatty), then dynamic_cast is a hack. Relying on the ability to cast a pointer to an abstract interface to a pointer to a concrete type defeats the purpose of using the abstract interface in the first place. –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 12:45
2  
Usually we should design a well abstraction to avoid run-time casts, otherwise, dynamic_cast is the final escape. –  M M. Mar 12 '13 at 12:46
5  
@JohnDibling: not to SuperChatty, dynamic_cast<IDictionary*>(chatty), where IDictionary is a new interface containing AddToDictionary and which is a base of SuperChatty. Attempting a dynamic cast to an interface isn't a hack, it's the mechanism that C++ provides for testing whether an object implements the interface. –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '13 at 12:48

4 Answers 4

Have dictionary be an object which can be updated and referenced by SuperChatty:

class Dictionary {
public:
    void add(const std::string& word);
    const std::set<std::string>>& words() const;
    //..
};

class SuperChatty : public IChatty
{
public:
    SuperChatty(Dictionary& dictionary) :
    dictionary(dictionary) {
    }

    virtual std::string Speak() const override
    {
        auto words = dictionary.words();
        ostringstream oss;
        copy(words.begin(), words.end(),
             ostream_iterator<string>(oss, " "));
        return oss.str();
    }
};

Usage:

int main()
{   
    Dictionary dictionary;
    IChatty* chatty = new SuperChatty(dictionary);
    dictionary.add("foo");
    std::cout << chatty->Speak() << std::endl;
}

edit

Okay, the question changed.

If you're doing this properly, you need to isolate yourself from the bad underlying system:

struct Dictionary {
    virtual ~Dictionary () {}
    virtual void add(const std::string& word) = 0;
};

struct Instrumenter {
    virtual ~Instrumenter () {}
    virtual void addDictionary(Dictionary& dictionary) = 0;
};

struct Chatter {
    virtual ~Chatter() {}
    virtual string speak() const = 0;
    virtual void instrument(Instrumenter& instrumenter) = 0;
};

These are implemented as:

class BasicChatter : public Chatter {
    virtual string speak() const {
        return chatty.Speak();
    }
    virtual void instrument(Instrumenter& instrumenter) {
        // do nothing
    }
private:
    SimpleChatty chatty;
};

class SuperChatter : public Chatter {
    SuperChatter () : dictionary(chatty);

    virtual void instrument(Instrumenter& instrumenter) {
        instrumenter.addDictionary(dictionary);
    }

    virtual string speak() const {
        return chatty.Speak();
    }
private:
    SuperChatty chatty;
    DictionaryImpl dictionary;
};
share|improve this answer
    
good suggestion, but Dictionary should have it's own interface –  BЈовић Mar 12 '13 at 12:54
    
I love interfaces, but why the should? –  Peter Wood Mar 12 '13 at 12:57
1  
@PeterWood: for example so that you can provide a stub IDictionary implementation when you're unit-testing SuperChatty. The general rule of thumb is that since SuperChatty has a dependency, the dependency should be on an interface and not on a concrete class. –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '13 at 12:59
1  
And how do you get to the dictionary when you are deep inside some other function that doesn't know whether this object has a dictionary or not? [As explained by the original poster in a comment on my suggestion]. –  Mats Petersson Mar 12 '13 at 12:59
1  
@JohnDibling: "and can't be separated from it" Why not? It seems to me that you're trapped in bad design. You don't seem to want inheritance at all; you want a component-based design, where each object has different optional components which you can query. –  Nicol Bolas Mar 12 '13 at 13:16

Make it derive from another interface and simply check, whether you can cast the object to that interface or not.

class IDictionary
{
public:
    virtual ~IDictionary() {};
    virtual void AddToDictionary(const std::string& word) = 0;
};

class SuperChatty : public IChatty, public IDictionary
{
     ... as before ...
};

int main()
{
    IChatty* chatty = new SuperChatty;

    IDictionary *dict = dynamic_cast<IDictionary*>(chatty);
    if (dict) dict->AddToDictionary("foo");
    std::cout << chatty->Speak() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
"...simply check whether you can cast..." As in dynamic_cast? –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 12:39
    
Yup. Compare with nullptr. –  Spook Mar 12 '13 at 12:52
1  
Hmm, this answer only has one upvote (mine), but my comment laying out the same idea has two. Maybe the crowd wants more detail in answers :-) –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '13 at 13:00
    
@SteveJessop: Yes, indeed. In fact, this is probably the way I will go, but without additional details that will be helpful to myself and future readers, I can't upvote or accept this answer. –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 13:04
    
@SteveJessop Thanks for providing the example, I planned to add it later. –  Spook Mar 13 '13 at 6:03

The main problem is that you're trowing away information that you need.

So the main solution is to not throw away information, but there's not enough code presented to flesh out the details of that.

Secondly, a tehcnical kludge solution is to just downcast, using dynamic_cast:

IChatty* newThingy();

int main()
{
    IChatty* chatty = newThingy();
    if( SuperChatty* p_super_chatty = dynamic_cast<SuperChatty*>( chatty ) )
    {
        p_super_chatty->AddToDictionary("foo");
    }
    std::cout << chatty->Speak() << std::endl;
}

You can downcast safely because the know static type IChatty is polymorphic.

share|improve this answer
    
Although this is what I have actually done up to now, it is a horrible hack. I came to SO with this question because I'm trying to get rid of this horrible hack. –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 13:03
1  
@JohnDibling: well you know, this additional requirement that you're adding should have been in your question. i assume that the downvote is yours. you are then effectively downvoting your own skills at askin, since the answer fully covers what you have asked, even though, lacking telepathic ability, i didn't know of the additional requirement you had in mind. more about the code and design would also have helped. how about, you know, stating things up front. don't just think it: we can't read your thoughts. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 12 '13 at 13:13
    
You're right. I should have clarified that downcasting to the concrete type is a horrible hack. Edited. –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 13:31

For this particular example, there's no reason to not create the object as this:

SuperChatty* chatty = new SuperChatty;

chatty->AddToDictionary("foo");

You can still pass chatty in the above segment as IChatty pointer or reference, e.g.

void Talk(IChatty *ch)
{
   ch->Speak();
}

[Likewise for storing the chatty in a vector<IChatty*> or something like that].

My point here is that if you are going to use the "new" interface functions, then you probably also want to create the class that has the new interface.

Adding code to "try to cast it", etc, gets very messy very quickly, and is error prone.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a contrived, oversimplified example. As I mentioned, in the real world these objects are constructed via factories. The analogue for AddToDictonary is not called until long, long after the object has been fully constructed. At that point, all I have is a reference-to the Interface. –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 12:52
    
@JohnDibling How do you know you want to add words to a dictionary? Are you keeping track of that possibility somewhere? Make your Chatty classes advertise their capabilities to some higher level controls, e.g. Chatty::enumerateCapabilities. –  Peter Wood Mar 12 '13 at 12:56
1  
@PeterWood: that would seem to be another "change IChatty" suggestion. These problems with a constraint of backward-compatibility to a published interface are interesting, because they teach us that C++ has tools to allow you to implement multiple small, focussed, independent interfaces rather than one giant catch-all. Writing code to test capabilities is just re-inventing dynamic_cast. –  Steve Jessop Mar 12 '13 at 13:03
    
@PeterWood: The real world answer to your question is complex, but I think I can sum it up thusly: Through other horrible hacks. Those are a story for another day. –  John Dibling Mar 12 '13 at 13:13

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