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#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
 double a = sqrt(2);
 cout << a << endl;
}

hi this is the program to find sqrt of 2 it prints just 1.41421 in the output how to implement it in way such that it will print 200000 digits after decimal point

1.41421..........upto 2 lakh digits

Is there any approach to print like this?

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7  
A double will give you about 16 significant digits. If you want 200000, you need an arbitrary precision library (GMP for example). –  Daniel Fischer Mar 12 '13 at 13:08
1  
3  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/822734/… –  Tony D Mar 12 '13 at 13:13
2  
You'll need to re-implement the sqrt() function yourself, as the standard one only returns up to a long double, or you'll need a library to do it. If you just need the answer, go to sagenb.org, create an account, and enter in something like: N(sqrt(2),2000) –  metal Mar 12 '13 at 13:15
1  
Assuming the assignment precludes the use of libraries like gmp, you might look into implementing a square root as a continued fraction expansion (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methods_of_computing_square_roots for a description). You'll still need a multi-precision integer however to contain that many digits. –  sizzzzlerz Mar 12 '13 at 14:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It can be shown that

sqrt(2) = (239/169)*1/sqrt(1-1/57122)

And 1/sqrt(1-1/57122) can be computed efficiently using the Taylor series expansion:

1/sqrt(1-x) = 1 + (1/2)x + (1.3)/(2.4)x^2 + (1.3.5)/(2.4.6)x^3 + ...

There's also a C program available that uses this method (I've slightly reformatted and corrected it):

/*
** Pascal Sebah : July 1999
**
** Subject:
**
**    A very easy program to compute sqrt(2) with many digits.
**    No optimisations, no tricks, just a basic program to learn how
**    to compute in multiprecision.
**
** Formula:
**
**    sqrt(2) = (239/169)*1/sqrt(1-1/57122)
**
** Data:
**
**    A big real (or multiprecision real) is defined in base B as:
**      X = x(0) + x(1)/B^1 + ... + x(n-1)/B^(n-1)
**      where 0<=x(i)<B
**
** Results: (PentiumII, 450Mhz)
**
**    1000   decimals :   0.02seconds
**    10000  decimals :   1.7s
**    100000 decimals : 176.0s
**
** With a little work it's possible to reduce those computation
** times by a factor of 3 and more.
*/

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

long B = 10000; /* Working base */
long LB = 4;    /* Log10(base)  */

/*
** Set the big real x to the small integer Integer
*/
void SetToInteger(long n, long* x, long Integer)
{
  long i;
  for (i = 1; i < n; i++)
    x[i] = 0;
  x[0] = Integer;
}

/*
** Is the big real x equal to zero ?
*/
long IsZero(long n, long* x)
{
  long i;
  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    if (x[i])
      return 0;
  return 1;
}

/*
** Addition of big reals : x += y
**  Like school addition with carry management
*/
void Add(long n, long* x, long* y)
{
  long carry = 0, i;
  for (i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--)
  {
    x[i] += y[i] + carry;
    if (x[i] < B)
      carry = 0;
    else
    {
      carry = 1;
      x[i] -= B;
    }
  }
}

/*
** Multiplication of the big real x by the integer q
*/
void Mul(long n, long* x, long q)
{
  long carry = 0, xi, i;
  for (i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--)
  {
    xi = x[i] * q;
    xi += carry;
    if (xi >= B)
    {
      carry = xi / B;
      xi -= carry * B;
    }
    else
      carry = 0;
    x[i] = xi;
  }
}

/*
** Division of the big real x by the integer d
**  Like school division with carry management
*/
void Div(long n, long* x, long d)
{
  long carry = 0, xi, q, i;
  for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
  {
    xi    = x[i] + carry * B;
    q     = xi / d;
    carry = xi - q * d;
    x[i]  = q;
  }  
}

/*
** Print the big real x
*/
void Print(long n, long* x)
{
  long i;
  printf("%ld.", x[0]);
  for (i = 1; i < n; i++)
    printf("%04ld", x[i]);
  printf("\n");
}

/*
** Computation of the constant sqrt(2)
*/
int main(void)
{
  long NbDigits = 200000, size = 1 + NbDigits / LB;
  long* r2 = malloc(size * sizeof(long));
  long* uk = malloc(size * sizeof(long));
  long k = 1;
  /*
  ** Formula used:
  **    sqrt(2) = (239/169)*1/sqrt(1-1/57122)
  ** and
  **   1/sqrt(1-x) = 1+(1/2)x+(1.3)/(2.4)x^2+(1.3.5)/(2.4.6)x^3+...
  */
  SetToInteger(size, r2, 1); /* r2 = 1 */
  SetToInteger(size, uk, 1); /* uk = 1 */
  while (!IsZero(size, uk))
  {
    Div(size, uk, 57122); /* uk = u(k-1)/57122 * (2k-1)/(2k) */
    Div(size, uk, 2 * k);
    Mul(size, uk, 2 * k - 1);
    Add(size, r2, uk);    /* r2 = r2+uk */
    k++;
  }
  Mul(size, r2, 239);
  Div(size, r2, 169);  /* r2 = (239/169)*r2 */

  Print(size, r2);     /* Print out of sqrt(2) */

  free(r2);
  free(uk);

  return 0;
}

It takes about a minute to calculate 200,000 digits of sqrt(2).

Note, however, at 200,000 digits the last 11 digits produced are incorrect due to the accumulated rounding errors and you need to run it for 200,012 digits if you want 200,000 correct digits.

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Here is the code for your question which using GNU GMP library. The code will print 1000 digits of sqrt(2), increase the number in the lines with comment to satisfy your request.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <gmp.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  mpf_t res,two;
  mpf_set_default_prec(1000000); // Increase this number.
  mpf_init(res);
  mpf_init(two);
  mpf_set_str(two, "2", 10);
  mpf_sqrt (res, two); 
  gmp_printf("%.1000Ff\n\n", res); // increase this number.
  return 0;
}

Please compile it with the following command:

$gcc gmp.c  -lgmp -lm -O0 -g3
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The example you give is accurate in so far as the precision of double arithmetic goes, this is the highest precision most C++ compilers use. In general computers are not tooled to do higher precision calculation. If this is homework of some sort then I suspect you are required to figure out an algorithm for calculating - you need to keep you own array of digits in some way to keep all the precision that you need. If you have some real-world application you should definitely use a high precision library specifically made to do this sort of arithmetic (GMP is a good open-source possibility) - this is a complicated wheel that doesn't need reinventing.

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I would suggest to look at http://www.apfloat.org/apfloat/ it is fast and free, and as per their benchmark calculating one million digits of pi takes less than half a minute with an Athlon XP computer.

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