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I would like to construct a timezone list to show it to users to select. The display name has to be like:

( GMT 5:30 ) India Standard Time(Asia/Calcutta)

I am taking all timezones with TimeZone.getAvailableIDs() and constructing the list. The code I wrote is:

String[] timeZones = TimeZone.getAvailableIDs();
List<String> tzList = new ArrayList<String>();
for (String timeZone : timeZones)
{
  TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(timeZone);
  StringBuilder timeZoneStr = new StringBuilder();
  timeZoneStr.append("( GMT ").append(tz.getRawOffset() / (60 * 60 * 1000)).append(" ) ").append(tz.getDisplayName()).append("(").append(timeZone).append(")");
  tzList.add(timeZoneStr.toString());
  System.out.println(timeZoneStr.toString());
}

A snippet of the output would be like:

( GMT 5 ) Maldives Time(Indian/Maldives)
( GMT 5 ) Pakistan Time(PLT)
( GMT 5 ) India Standard Time(Asia/Calcutta)
( GMT 5 ) India Standard Time(Asia/Kolkata)
( GMT 5 ) India Standard Time(IST)

But the output I need to get is:

( GMT 5:0 ) Maldives Time(Indian/Maldives)
( GMT 5:0 ) Pakistan Time(PLT)
( GMT 5:30 ) India Standard Time(Asia/Calcutta)
( GMT 5:30 ) India Standard Time(Asia/Kolkata)
( GMT 5:30 ) India Standard Time(IST)

What should I do to get 5:30?

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2  
Obviouly you are truncating the minutes in this line tz.getRawOffset() / (60 * 60 * 1000) - you need to be slightly more careful. First exctract whole hours then the minutes and concat them. –  Boris the Spider Mar 12 '13 at 13:38
    
@bmorris591, you are absolutely correct. –  Filipe Fedalto Mar 12 '13 at 13:53
    
Thanks @bmorris591 I got it worked now. –  John Mar 12 '13 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A more readable answer is the following:

for (String timeZone : timeZones) {
  TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(timeZone);

  long hours = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toHours(tz.getRawOffset());
  long minutes = TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.toMinutes(tz.getRawOffset())
      - TimeUnit.HOURS.toMinutes(hours);

  String timeZoneString = String.format("( GMT %d:%02d ) %s(%s)", hours,
      minutes, tz.getDisplayName(), timeZone);
  tzList.add(timeZoneString);
  System.out.println(timeZoneString);
}

This also correctly displays e.g. 5:00 and 5:30. The use of String.format() makes the final string easier to determine when reading the code. The use of the TimeUnit class simplifies the maths.

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There is one slight display issue when in negative half-hour timezones. For example, "Pacific/Marquesas" should display as "(GMT -9:30)", usually not "(GMT -9:-30)". I'd apply Math.abs() to "minutes", long minutes = Math.abs(...) –  xflin Jun 20 '14 at 18:57

You should switch the timezone forming line to:

timeZoneStr.append("( GMT ").append(tz.getRawOffset() / (60 * 60 * 1000)).append(":").append((tz.getRawOffset() / (60 * 1000))%60).append(" ) ").append(tz.getDisplayName()).append("(").append(timeZone).append(")");

I think this is the answer you're looking for. However, you may still format the minutes, as they only show one digit when the time offset is, for example 12 hours. It's shown as 12:0.

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Another solution with the proper formatting :

DateFormat fmt = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm");
fmt.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));

List<String> tzList = new ArrayList<String>();
for (String timeZone : TimeZone.getAvailableIDs()) {   
    TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(timeZone);

    StringBuilder timeZoneStr = new StringBuilder();
    timeZoneStr.append("( GMT ");
    if (tz.getRawOffset() < 0) {
        timeZoneStr.append("-");
    }
    timeZoneStr.append(fmt.format(new Date(Math.abs(tz.getRawOffset()))));
    timeZoneStr.append(" ) ").append(tz.getDisplayName()).append(timeZone).append(")");

    tzList.add(timeZoneStr.toString());
    System.out.println(timeZoneStr.toString());
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I think the use of a DateFormat, while clever, is a little overcomplicated for this problem. If you are using Java 5 or newer, the TimeUnit class is very neat. See my answer. –  Duncan Mar 12 '13 at 14:13
    
He wants to format a time, that's exactly the purpose of DateFormat, isn't it? –  Emmanuel Bourg Mar 12 '13 at 14:36
1  
I would say an offset is different to a time. Note the extra leg-work you've had to do to account for the potentially negative value of the offset. A time cannot be negative. Anyway, it was just an observation, it's still a clever approach to the problem. –  Duncan Mar 12 '13 at 15:13
    
why "UTC" but printing GMT? –  ses Nov 27 '14 at 16:08
    
@ses Because the original poster wanted GMT –  Emmanuel Bourg Nov 28 '14 at 11:58

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