Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently developing a small utility with the following GUI:

Sample GUI

Right now i have a container (JPanel) with the BorderLayout layout that holds everything in place. The i have another 2 JPanels placed on BorderLayout.NORTH and BorderLayout.SOUTH respectively, each whith the GridLayout (2 columns by 1 row). The table is on the main container placed at the CENTER of it.

Do you think this is the best approach? I'm having a rough time dealing with spacing between the components and the borders of the frame.

Right now i have this code:

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JMenu;
import javax.swing.JMenuBar;
import javax.swing.JMenuItem;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JSeparator;
import javax.swing.JTable;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class GUI extends JFrame {

    private JButton loadFileBtn = new JButton("Load File");
    private JButton generateReportBtn = new JButton("Generate Report");
    private JButton exitBtn = new JButton("Exit");
    private JLabel fileNameLbl = new JLabel("File Name Here");
    private JMenuBar menuBar = new JMenuBar();
    private JMenu fileMI = new JMenu("File");
    private JMenuItem openFileMenu = new JMenuItem("Open File");
    private JSeparator separator = new JSeparator();
    private JMenuItem exitMenu = new JMenuItem("Exit");
    private JMenu reportMI = new JMenu("Report");
    private JMenuItem generateReportMenu = new JMenuItem("Generate Report");
    private JMenu helpMI = new JMenu("Help");
    private JMenuItem aboutMenu = new JMenuItem("About");
    private JTable table = new JTable(5, 2);
    private JPanel mainPanel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout(10, 10));
    private JPanel panel1 = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
    private JPanel panel2 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 2));
    private JPanel panel3 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 2));

    public GUI() {

        super("Sample GUI");

        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
        setResizable(false);

        setLayout(new BorderLayout(10, 10));

        fileMI.add(openFileMenu);
        fileMI.add(separator);
        fileMI.add(exitMenu);

        reportMI.add(generateReportMenu);

        helpMI.add(aboutMenu);

        menuBar.add(fileMI);
        menuBar.add(reportMI);
        menuBar.add(helpMI);

        setJMenuBar(menuBar);

        panel1.add(table, BorderLayout.CENTER);

        panel2.add(fileNameLbl);
        panel2.add(loadFileBtn);

        panel3.add(generateReportBtn);
        panel3.add(exitBtn);

        mainPanel.add(panel2, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        mainPanel.add(panel1, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        mainPanel.add(panel3, BorderLayout.SOUTH);

        add(mainPanel);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                GUI app = new GUI();
                app.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}

What do you think would be the best approach to do this?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.


UPDATE:

Right now, i have the following GUI

enter image description here

I want the components to space away from the borders evenly, like in the mockup.

share|improve this question
    
What is your problem exactly? Which space would you like to introduce and causes issues? You can always use BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(int, int, int, int) –  Guillaume Polet Mar 12 '13 at 14:19
    
@Guillaume Polet not sure, please not attack, are you meaning, to use EmptyBorder to avoiding setPreferredSize, or to use EmptyBorder to avoiding SpringLayout with GridBagLayout in the NestedLayout form , MigLayout or ... –  mKorbel Mar 12 '13 at 14:25
    
@mKorbel Empty borders are a very easy (and sometime elegant) solution to properly position components in their container without having to switch to another LayoutManager. If the OP feels comfortable with those LayoutManager's, empty borders may be a good solution to his actual problems. –  Guillaume Polet Mar 12 '13 at 14:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

2 things you can use to make this happen:

  1. Use BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(int, int, int, int)
  2. Use the 4-args constructor of GridLayout

There are other LayoutManager's which can bring the same functionality (like GridBagLayout, or using nested BorderLayout), but if you feel comfortable with the current LayoutManager's, there is no imperious need to change to those. The way you did is also acceptable.

enter image description here

You might consider wrapping the table in a JScrollPane to make it nicer, with headers and scrollbars if ever needed.

Small example code:

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.GridLayout;

import javax.swing.BorderFactory;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JMenu;
import javax.swing.JMenuBar;
import javax.swing.JMenuItem;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JSeparator;
import javax.swing.JTable;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class GUI extends JFrame {

    private JButton loadFileBtn = new JButton("Load File");
    private JButton generateReportBtn = new JButton("Generate Report");
    private JButton exitBtn = new JButton("Exit");
    private JLabel fileNameLbl = new JLabel("File Name Here");
    private JMenuBar menuBar = new JMenuBar();
    private JMenu fileMI = new JMenu("File");
    private JMenuItem openFileMenu = new JMenuItem("Open File");
    private JSeparator separator = new JSeparator();
    private JMenuItem exitMenu = new JMenuItem("Exit");
    private JMenu reportMI = new JMenu("Report");
    private JMenuItem generateReportMenu = new JMenuItem("Generate Report");
    private JMenu helpMI = new JMenu("Help");
    private JMenuItem aboutMenu = new JMenuItem("About");
    private JTable table = new JTable(5, 2);
    private JPanel mainPanel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout(10, 10));
    private JPanel panel1 = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
    private JPanel panel2 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 2, 10, 10));
    private JPanel panel3 = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 2, 10, 10));

    public GUI() {

        super("Sample GUI");

        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
        setResizable(false);

        setLayout(new BorderLayout(10, 10));

        fileMI.add(openFileMenu);
        fileMI.add(separator);
        fileMI.add(exitMenu);

        reportMI.add(generateReportMenu);

        helpMI.add(aboutMenu);

        menuBar.add(fileMI);
        menuBar.add(reportMI);
        menuBar.add(helpMI);

        setJMenuBar(menuBar);

        panel1.add(table, BorderLayout.CENTER);

        panel2.add(fileNameLbl);
        panel2.add(loadFileBtn);

        panel3.add(generateReportBtn);
        panel3.add(exitBtn);

        mainPanel.add(panel2, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        mainPanel.add(panel1, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        mainPanel.add(panel3, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
        mainPanel.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(10, 10, 10, 10));
        add(mainPanel);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                GUI app = new GUI();
                app.setVisible(true);
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what i wanted. Thank you @Guillaume Polet. I also tried GridBagLayout but i can't seem to grasp the concept. Any good tutorias you'd recommend? Tha one's on orcles's webpage are not that easy for a beginner. –  DaveQuinn Mar 12 '13 at 14:40
    
hmmmm are you know that Empty JPanels added to W, E, S, N area to JFrame to create this gap automatically, there no reason to add EmptyBorders for this idea :-) –  mKorbel Mar 12 '13 at 14:41
    
@mKorbel Do you suggest to rather add empty JPanel with a forced preferred size to the West, East, North and South of the JFrame? –  Guillaume Polet Mar 12 '13 at 14:43
    
Like @Gilbert Le Blanc suggested, using FlowLayout instead of GridLayout should be much more flexible and allow me to create the gap between the label and the button, on the north, and the two buttons, on the South area. What's your opinion? –  DaveQuinn Mar 12 '13 at 14:56
1  
@mKorbel OK I see what you mean now. If I add empty JPanels, the hGap and vGap of the BorderLayout will enter in action and will make an empty border appear automatically. Personnally, I still prefer the explicit empty border which has been created precisely to achieve the described effect. Colors and tastes can always be argued.... ;-) –  Guillaume Polet Mar 12 '13 at 15:28

In the past, I have found that using MigLayout, solves all my problems

share|improve this answer
1  
Yep, MigLayout is almost always the way I go. Pretty easy to learn, and really easy to use. –  WChargin Mar 12 '13 at 14:38
    
Did not know this. Thaks, will check it out. –  DaveQuinn Mar 12 '13 at 14:42

Here's how I would arrange your GUI. This is just one way. It's not the only way.

  • The JTable goes inside of a JScrollPane.

  • Button2 and Button3 go inside of a button JPanel with a FlowLayout.

  • Label and Button1 go inside of a label JPanel with a FlowLayout.

  • File, Report, and Help are JMenuItems on a JMenuBar.

  • The main JPanel has a BoxLayout with a Y_AXIS orientation.

  • Add the label JPanel, the JScrollPane, and the button JPanel to the main JPanel.

share|improve this answer
    
Will try @Gilbert Le Blanc. Thanks for your input. Much appreciated. –  DaveQuinn Mar 12 '13 at 14:39

The best way is to create a GUI is to code in a way you and others will understand . Take a look at this Guide to Layout Managers. You can use different layout managers for different components. This will help you setting correct spacing.

If your problem is just the spacing around the components, set its Insets.

share|improve this answer
    
Which Layout Managers do you recommend for this design? That is the motivation behind my question. –  DaveQuinn Mar 12 '13 at 14:31
    
GridBagLayout is the most flexible in my opinion. But maybe I would mix some layout managers. Put a panel on top and in the bottom and table in the middle with BorderLayout. The panels in the bottom I would use FlowLayout and the panel int top maybe FlowLayout or GridBagLayout. Or do everything with GridBagLayout (a lot lot of coding). –  Jean Waghetti Mar 12 '13 at 14:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.