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It is possible to build an SSL/TLS server which is running on an iOS device? If yes, how?

My doubts are related to these questions: On the device, can I create on the fly a self-signed certificate to be used from then on? Or can I tell SSL/TLS not to use certificates?

In my iOS app I'm using AsyncSocket. The app is at the same time both client and server.

The client-side is implemented in this way:

- (void)onSocket:(AsyncSocket *)sock didConnectToHost:(NSString *)host port:(UInt16)port {
    // Don't even validate the certificate chain
    NSDictionary *settings = @{(NSString *)kCFStreamSSLValidatesCertificateChain : (id)kCFBooleanFalse};

    [sock startTLS:settings];
}

- (void)onSocketDidSecure:(AsyncSocket *)sock {
    // omitted: send the message...
}

The server-side (which is running on another iOS device) is implemented in this way:

- (void)onSocket:(AsyncSocket *)sock didConnectToHost:(NSString *)host port:(UInt16)port {
    // Don't even validate the certificate chain
    NSDictionary *settings = @{(NSString *)kCFStreamSSLValidatesCertificateChain : (id)kCFBooleanFalse,
                            (NSString *)kCFStreamSSLIsServer : (id)kCFBooleanTrue};

    [sock startTLS:settings];
}

- (void)onSocketDidSecure:(AsyncSocket *)sock {
    // omitted: read the message...
}

However, when the client attempts to connect to the server, the delegate's method onSocket:willDisconnectWithError: is called, with the error Domain=kCFStreamErrorDomainSSL Code=-9848.

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is possible to build an SSL/TLS server which is running on an iOS device? If yes, how?

Absolutely. I have used CocoaHTTPServer with SSL/TLS both on the simulator and on the device for testing purposes. To use client certificates you need to make some modifications, most of these are in a patch in their GitHub issues list.

Can you create certs on the fly on iOS? Not that I know of.

Can you tell SSL to not use certificates? Ummm. Even if you could, what would be the point of using SSL? The certificates are what "secures" the transport. SSL is a model of trust, with the parties on either end of the link evaluating the trust of the other party. If you are creating certs on the fly, or attempting to not use certs period, you are invalidating that trust model - you are not securing much of anything.

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Thanks for your answer! If I can't create a certificate on iOS, what certificate would you use? Do you embed one in the app's bundle? But since the app is distributed on the App Store, would it be possible for an attacker to extrapolate it and decrypt transmissions using the private key contained in it? –  Dev Mar 21 '13 at 9:01
1  
Yes, you would have to create one yourself and include it in your app - and yes, that does mean someone could recover that cert from the application bundle. You're damned if you do, damned if you don't. You can put the cert in the application's keychain on first run and keep it there, but no matter what the cert has to come from somewhere, and an attacker could get the cert and password easily. –  quellish Mar 21 '13 at 19:37
    
But if I protect the certificate with a password? Can I read it from iOS? (Obviously this means the app must have the password obscured somewhat in binary, but it is still better than nothing!) PS I read the patch to CocoaHTTPServer you have linked, but it seems to refer to the client and I can't understand how it can help me on the server side. –  Dev Mar 22 '13 at 10:15
1  
If you protect the password, yes that works. The CocoaHTTPServer patch is for client certificate SSL authentication - where both sides of the connection have their trust verified. Both the client and server have certificates that are used to verify the other. So in addition to the server being trusted by the client, which everyone is familiar with, the server also is evaluating wether the client is who they say they are. This makes things a bit more complex, often for little benefit (but hey, if you want to go that route, there's the patch). Out of the box CocoaHTTPServer does SSL without that –  quellish Mar 23 '13 at 0:36
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