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I have recently played with code in java, and encountered this problem, that the code inside the constructor seems to be not executed, as the compiler throws the NullPointerException.

public class ObjectA {

protected static ObjectA oa;
private String message = "The message";

public ObjectA() {

    oa = new ObjectA();

}

public static void main(String args[]) {

    System.out.println(oa.message);

}  }

Now when i move the creation of the object before the constructor, i.e. I do it in one line, then everything works fine.

Can anyone explain to me why does this happen, and where my understanding of the code is wrong?

Thanks in advance.

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4  
Such a mess in so little code. –  partlov Mar 12 '13 at 15:15
    
agreed with partlov. In your main - System.out.println(oa.message) where are you creating the object oa? –  PC. Mar 12 '13 at 15:17
    
@PC Not just that, class ObjectA is class of main method, in it there is static value of itself, which is never initialized because constructor is never called, and in constructor is initialized static field!? –  partlov Mar 12 '13 at 15:19
    
@partlov, please excuse the "mess", I tried to simplify a bigger code, which I thought would be too painfull to post, but I saved the points that have caused me problems. –  Yakuman Mar 12 '13 at 15:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You're never calling the ObjectA() constructor, except in the ObjectA constructor. If you ever did call the constructor (e.g. from main), you'd get a stack overflow because you'd be recursing forever.

It's not really clear what you're trying to do or why you're using a static variable, but your code would be simpler as:

public class ObjectA {
    private String message = "The message";

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ObjectA oa = new ObjectA();
        System.out.println(oa.message);
    }
}

Also note that the compiler never throws an exception. It's very important to distinguish between compile-time errors (syntax errors etc) and execution-time errors (typically exceptions).

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This code is a really simplified version of the code I got for the GUI im working on, basicly same error is thrown. The thing is that the generated (netBeans) part used new ObjectA.setVisible(true);, and i needed to use a reference so I tried to create the object in the constructor, thanx again for the answer, I understand where my logic went wrong. –  Yakuman Mar 12 '13 at 15:34

You need to move ObjectA oa = new ObjectA() to your main method.

Also, there is no need for this: protected static ObjectA oa;

You should copy/paste a Hello World program from a tutorial and see how it works.

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This would throw a StackOverflowError –  Didier L Mar 12 '13 at 15:17
    
When I said "put" I meant "move". –  ktm5124 Mar 12 '13 at 15:19

You define a static variable oa but you only ever intialise it in the class's constructor. You never instantiate your class ObjectA so oa can only ever be null.

When you call your main method it tries to access the message variable of a null object, hence the NPE.

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1) You never create an object

put:

ObjectA oa = new ObjectA();

in your main before your System.out.print.

2) set the message to public instead of private.

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Hope something you need like this

public class ObjectA {

    protected static ObjectA oa;
    private String message = "The message";

    public ObjectA() {
    }

    public static ObjectA getInstance() {
        if (oa == null) {
            oa = new ObjectA();
        }
        return oa;
    }

    public String getMessage() {
        return message;
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println(ObjectA.getInstance().getMessage());
    }
}
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