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I have a University assignement that requires me to implement an inner class which implements the Iterator interface. The iterator works on a single-linked list superclass.

Currently my inner class looks like this:

private class ListIterator implements Iterator<V>{

    Node temp;
    boolean nextCalled = false;

    ListIterator(Node fo){
        this.temp = fo;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        if(temp != null){
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public V next() {
        nextCalled = true;
        return temp.getReprValue();
    }

    @Override
    public void remove() {
        if(nextCalled && hasNext()){
            nextCalled = false;
            removeElement(temp.getReprKey());
            temp = temp.getNext();
        }

    }

}

Now my problem is that the hasNext() method returns true even when the list is actually empty. Everything else seems to work. I have probably overlooked a logic flaw somewhere, but I cannot find it myself.

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1  
next method supposed not only to return value, but somehow move iterator into the next position. Your implementation just stores a flag. –  default locale Mar 12 '13 at 15:23
    
Shouldn't the value of temp be changed in your next() method? –  Approaching Darkness Fish Mar 12 '13 at 15:25
    
On a side note, there's already an interface named ListIterator in the same package as Iterator... so you might want to choose a different name. –  Powerlord Mar 12 '13 at 15:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Changed your implementation to reflect what the Iterator contract needs. You need to remenber that you need to be able to iterate over all elements of the collection, i.e., next() should start from first element and after every call if must changed the current next element for the next element in the list and throw an exception if there's none.

It's good to read the Iterator interface doc to undestand the way you need to implement it and start from there.

private class ListIterator implements Iterator<V> {
    private Node next;
    private boolean alreadyDeleted = false;

    ListIterator(Node node){
        this.next = node;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNext() {
        // because next is the current element. We need to iterate over all the elements
        // from the collection.
        return next != null;
    }

    @Override
    public V next() {
        if (next == null) {
           throw new NoSuchElementException();
        }

        Node current = next;

        this.next = current.getNext();
        this.alreadyDeleted = false; // it's better to try to elimate this state variable. You can try to do in another way, if yours removeElement returns something

        return current;
    }

    @Override
    public void remove() {
        if (alreadyDeleted || next == null) {
           throw new IllegalStateException();
        }
        removeElement(next.getReprKey());
        this.alreadyRemoved = true;
    }

}
share|improve this answer

You need to keep track of where you are in your list, implement a cursor, or if your nodes in the linked list are aware of their next, just ask them if they have a next element. When the cursor is bigger then the length / your node has no next you return false in hasNext().

Do all this in your hasNext() method. Remember, it's okay to have next() throw an exception if hasNext() would have been false - so you need to make sure that's the only time it will throw an exception.

As I don't know the underlying data structure of your list, I can't tell you which one of these will be better.

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hasNext returns true if the current node (temp) is not null.

If your linked list implementation uses a header node, then the constructor always receives fo!=null and hasNext will return true even though the list is empty. You should consider this fact in your implementation.

Based on your code, it seem that

ListIterator(Node fo){
    this.temp = fo.getNext();
}

may do the trick (if header.getNext()==null for an empty list).

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Well, you could reduce some of your code, and make it a touch more readable

@Override
public boolean hasNext() {
    if(temp != null){
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

would work just as well as (which would make it obvious that temp has the next value)

@Override
public boolean hasNext() {
  return temp != null;
}

But as for the special flag "nextCalled", it seems that it complicates the logic quite a but. How about renaming temp, which is a lousy variable name, to next.

@Override
public boolean hasNext() {
  return next != null;
}

And then to track deletion, you probably should have some concept of the current node.

private Node current;

Which makes the update look a bit like

public Node getNext() {
  if (hasNext()) {
    current = next;
    next = next.getNextNode();
  }
  return current;
}

and the delete could then set current to null. Now you really don't need a flag (assuming that you are fine with doing nothing if a person deletes prior to calling the first getNext(). Heck, if you really want to go for the gold, have remove() throw an IllegalStateException if current == null.

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