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I have a container that is working similar to notifications in mac os - elements are added to the queue and removed after a certain timeout. This works great but has one jarring visual side effect.

When they are removed from the DOM there is a jagged update to the UI as the next element in the stack fills the void created by the previous element. I would like the elements below in the stack to move up into that space smoothly, ideally with css3 but adding a transition: all 0.5s ease-in-out to the .notice class had no effect on the object when its sibling was remove.

Minimal JS interpertation :

$('#add').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#container').append('<p class="notice">Notice #</p>');
});

$('body').on('click','p.notice', function(e) {
    $(this).fadeOut();
});

Better yet fiddle here :

http://jsfiddle.net/kMxqj/

I'm using a MVC framework to data-bind these objects so some native css / jQuery is preferred over a Jq plugin.

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should remove the clicked element with a fade out effect and then move everything below up smoothly. This will work for any notice div in the stack regardless of it position within the stack.

Try:

$('body').on('click','p.notice', function(e) {
    $(this).fadeOut(500,function(){
        $(this).css({"visibility":"hidden",display:'block'}).slideUp();
    });
});

Fiddle here

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1  
this works great, tacking on a remove() as a callback to the slideUp does exactly what I need -- Fiddle: jsfiddle.net/kMxqj/19 –  jarmie Mar 12 '13 at 16:54
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A simple way of doing this would be to animate the height and margin properties - http://jsfiddle.net/kMxqj/14/

$('#add').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#container').append('<p class="notice">Notice #</p>');
});

$('body').on('click','p.notice', function(e) {
    $(this).animate({'height':0,'margin':'0'});
    $(this).fadeOut();
});

This will animate the height and margins to 0, while also fading out the object which results in a smooth transition. Also adding overflow hidden to your notice box so any content inside is covered as the animation happens.

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jQuery's Animate() method is a great tool to learn because not only can you fade your objects in and out, but you can move them around, all at the same time.

The CSS:

.notice {
    position:relative;
    top:20px;
    width: 100%;
    height: 50px;
    background-color: #ccc;
    opacity:0;
}

The jQuery:

$('#add').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#container').append('<p class="notice">Notice #</p>');
    $('.notice').animate({opacity: 1, top:0}, 1000);
});

$('body').on('click','p.notice', function(e) {
    $(this).fadeOut();
});

And my jsFiddle demo

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The problem isn't with animating the new object in, but with with the dom removal (simulated with the fade out) the nodes following the element being removed jump up into the gap created by the removed node. –  jarmie Mar 12 '13 at 16:47
    
have you tried using $this).fadeOut().remove(); –  blackhawk Mar 12 '13 at 16:51
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How about this fiddle

CSS

.notice {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    background-color: #ccc;
}

JS

$('#add').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#container').append('<p class="notice">Notice #</p>');
    $('#container p.notice:last-child').animate({
        width: 100%,
        height: 50px
    });
});

$('body').on('click','p.notice', function(e) {
    $(this).fadeOut();
});

Tweak the values as needbe, but something like this should accomplish what you'd like - it sounds like animate() might be what you want though

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