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Are there standard delegates in C# that I can just use for invoke. Do I have to declare a new delegate for every new function signature I have to invoke ?

Right now I just have those signatures. But if I can use a native delegate for any complexity of returns and parameters that would be great.

public bool isDone()
{...}
public void doStuff()
{...}
public void doMoreStuff(object o)
{...}
public void doEvenMoreStuff(string str)
{...}

// I'm declaring my "custom" delegates like this:
private delegate bool delegate_bool();
private delegate void delegate_void(string line);

// and calling via
if (InvokeRequired)
    Invoke(new delegate_void(doStuff), new object[] { });
else
    {...}


Edit: Answer seems to be Action<> and Func<>.

if (InvokeRequired)
    return Invoke(new Func<bool>(isDone), new object[] { });
else
    {...}
if (InvokeRequired)
    BeginInvoke(new Action(doStuff), new object[] { });
else
    {...}
if (InvokeRequired)
    BeginInvoke(new Action<string>(doEvenMoreStuff), new object[] { "hello world" });
else
    {...}
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The Action<> and Func<> delegates are the "standard" delegates that you should use whenever possible. There are very few situations in which they cannot be used.

In particular if you have optional arguments, ref or out parameters, more than 16 parameters, or have a params parameter then you will need to use another (or your own custom) delegate.

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You're looking for the Action<*> and Func<*> delegates, which do exactly that.

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The Action<> and Func<> delegates will provide you with what you need

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Yes, you can use Action and a lambda. For example, Dispatcher.Invoke requires a delegate, but we can cast a lambda to Action and therefore do not need to define a new delegate for it:

Dispatcher.Invoke((Action)delegate() { ... });
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Action<> and Func<> can perform these types of tasks.

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As all have said. Action and Func will do what you want. Action should be used on methods that don't return values and you can use Func if a return value is required.

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