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Below are the two strings-

12/31/2011 05:34:27;U;11.comp;host=win workgroup=home username=bob cmemory=1325133456 qmemory=1325133456 smemory=1325133456 uptime=1325289867 
12/31/2011 01:09:20;D;12.comp;host=win workgroup=home username=sam cmemory=1325151687 qmemory=1325151687 smemory=1325151687 uptime=1325228636  session=4677 downtime=1325270175 Exit_status=0

From above strings I want to pick host, workgroup, username, uptime and downtime values using Regex in Perl.

Below is my Perl script-

foreach $line (<FILE>) {
    if($line =~ m<\d{2}/\d{2}/\d{4}\s+\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2};[U|D].*host=(\w+)\s+workgroup=(\w+)\s+hostname=(\w+)\s+.*uptime=(\d+)\s+.*(downtime=)?(\d*)>){
        my $host      = $1;
        my $workgroup = $2;
        my $hostname  = $3;
        my $uptime    = $4;
        my $downtime  = $5;
        print "host=$host workgroup=$workgroup hostname=$hostname uptime=$uptime downtime=$downtime\n";
    }
}

The only problem, I am facing here is because of downtime. This attribute may not be present in the line. I am not able to pick this field properly.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Why not use split instead? Then you could add the various categories to a hash, like so:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

while (<DATA>) {
    my ($date, $foo, $bar, $data) = split /;/, $_, 4;
    my %data = map { split /=/ } split ' ', $data;
    print Dumper \%data;
}

__DATA__
12/31/2011 05:34:27;U;11.comp;host=win workgroup=home username=bob cmemory=1325133456 qmemory=1325133456 smemory=1325133456 uptime=1325289867 
12/31/2011 01:09:20;D;12.comp;host=win workgroup=home username=sam cmemory=1325151687 qmemory=1325151687 smemory=1325151687 uptime=1325228636  session=4677 downtime=1325270175 Exit_status=0

Output:

$VAR1 = {
          'workgroup' => 'home',
          'cmemory' => '1325133456',
          'qmemory' => '1325133456',
          'uptime' => '1325289867',
          'smemory' => '1325133456',
          'username' => 'bob',
          'host' => 'win'
        };
$VAR1 = {
          'qmemory' => '1325151687',
          'Exit_status' => '0',
          'smemory' => '1325151687',
          'username' => 'sam',
          'host' => 'win',
          'workgroup' => 'home',
          'cmemory' => '1325151687',
          'session' => '4677',
          'downtime' => '1325270175',
          'uptime' => '1325228636'
        };

If you now want to refer to the "downtime" value, you can do something such as:

my $downtime = $hash{downtime} // "N/A";

Where // is the defined-or operator, somewhat preferred here over logical or ||.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats cool. Two questions (1)Can you please suggest me Regex for the same? (2)Can you please modify your split, so that it can pick U and 11.comp filed also? – Ravi Joshi Mar 12 '13 at 17:50
    
@RaviJoshi - Don't use a regex to do this. Use the right tool for the right job. – Jack Maney Mar 12 '13 at 18:08
    
@JackManey: I am confused!!! Right tool for the Right job. Please explain me in detail. Why not regex? – Ravi Joshi Mar 12 '13 at 18:10
    
Because you know what your delimiters are. – Jack Maney Mar 12 '13 at 18:11
1  
@RaviJoshi Those variables are all picked up in the initial split. The place where it says $date, $foo, $bar, $data. You'll have to name the variables better, I did not know what they were meant to represent, besides the date. – TLP Mar 12 '13 at 18:35

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