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.NET framework has got a Dictionary<TKey,TValue> class which is implemented as hash tables and provides data retrieval in constant time (O(1)). I am looking for a similar implementation in C++. I know about std::map but in this data retrieval takes logarithmic time. Is there any good hash table implementation in C++ which will retrieve data in constant time?

If I am writing my own, how will I calculate hash code for the key? Like .NET, I thought of having GetHashCode() method on types.

template<typename TKey,typename TVal>
class Dictionary
{
public:
   void Add(TKey key, TVal val){
       int hashCode = key.GetHashCode();
       /* .... */
   }
}

If I did like the above and the given key type doesn't have GetHashCode() method, compiler will throw error. But this method won't work when key is primitive types like int. I may need to write a wrapper for int by providing GetHashCode.

I wonder what is the C++ way of implementing this?

Any thoughts?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Also, check out C++ Technical Report 1 for std::tr1::unordered_map if a strict adherence to C++ standard is required.

Actually std::hash_map is not C++ standard but widely used anyway.

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Note that there are two different versions of the (non-standard) std::hash_map around. I'd use std::tr1::unordered_map which is bound to become the next standard version's std::unordered_map. –  sbi Oct 8 '09 at 10:36
    
std::hash_map is an SGI extension. It's available in G++ as well, but in a different namespace (__gnu_cxx, I believe). –  Michael Ekstrand Oct 8 '09 at 15:01
    
But there's also a Dinkumware version. (I think it's now in the stdext namespace or something like it, but it used to be in the std namespace so there's versions of their library out there where it is.) –  sbi Oct 8 '09 at 16:36
    
Thanks for the reply –  Appu Oct 10 '09 at 7:15

boost::unordered_map is probably your best and most widely portable solution at this point, if you don't have a TR1 implementation to hand.

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If you're looking for ready-to-use implementation, then apart from STL/TR1 and Boost hashmaps, there's also google-sparsehash (it contains two implementations - one optimised for space and one optimised for speed).

If you want to write your own, then GetHashCode could be implemented as a separate functor, e.g.

template < typename TKey, typename TValue, typename THash = someDefaultHash<TKey> >
class Dictionary
{
public:
   void Add(TKey key, TVal val){
       int hashCode = THash()(key);
       /* .... */
   }
}

That's how SGI's hash_map does it.

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Thanks for the reply. This looks promising. I will give a try. –  Appu Oct 10 '09 at 7:16

In C++ you would pass a the type of a functor which has the hash function as a type parameter to the template.

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Perhaps, std::hash_map?

Note that this isn't part of the standard STL library specifications but is often available. It's in the MS libraries and the SGI libraries (as the link suggests) and in STLport.

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1  
While not truly standard, nearly every compiler the last 5 years implements one (though MSVC and G++ have slightly different semantics.) Preference should be on unordered_map or the equivalent boost container. –  Joe Oct 8 '09 at 10:35

Assuming you're using VS 2008 with the Feature Pack or service pack 1 installed, you have an implementation of TR1, which includes TR1::unordered_map.

OTOH, unless you're really creating a huge collection, chances are that std::map will be more competitive than you expect. In my tests, it's pretty common for the two to nearly tie, and std::map can and does come out faster fairly frequently.

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In fact, often a std::vector<std::pair<K,V> > competes with a std::map<K,V>. I think there's an item for this in Meyers' "Effective STL" book (amazon.com/gp/product/0321334876). –  sbi Oct 8 '09 at 16:39
2  
There is, but it only competes under rather specific circumstances. For fast lookups, the vector has to be sorted. It works nicely if things work in phases, where you collect all the data, then you can sort it, then you do searches (but rarely insert or delete after you sort). Something like map is better if you intermix insertions, deletions, and searches. –  Jerry Coffin Oct 8 '09 at 16:49
    
@Jerry: Yes, you summarized it very nicely. –  sbi Oct 9 '09 at 10:27

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