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(100..999).each do |x| 
  (100..999).each do |y|

    z = x * y
    a = []

    if z.to_s.reverse == z.to_s
        a.push(z)
    end

    puts a

  end
end

This code is probably absolutely horrible but I'm having issues getting values to "stick" to my array. Whenever I run the code it returns all the numbers as an array with a single value in and I'm unsure as to why, any explanation of why and how to fix this would be nice. More of a learning exercise than anything.

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Indenting your code would make it much easier to follow. Otherwise, it's not horrible. –  iamnotmaynard Mar 12 '13 at 18:15
    
Ah sorry. My baaaad. –  Alex Morris Mar 12 '13 at 18:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to put the a = [] outside your blocks, like this:

a = []

(100..999).each do |x| 
  (100..999).each do |y|

    z = x * y

    a.push(z) if z.to_s.reverse == z.to_s

  end
end

puts a

If you fail to do that, a new array will be made during each loop. To understand this, you should look into documentation about scopes. If you define the avariable inside the each scope, it will be local to that scope, and that's why your values don't "stick" -> persist.

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I see your point but it doesn't appear to be working. When the array was inside the scope it would print out the values fine however with your change it prints many of the same value and takes much longer, I've not actually seen it finish. –  Alex Morris Mar 12 '13 at 18:26
    
Because of the way you've written your code. Using puts, outputs the array elements line by line during each loop. I'll modify the code and show you what should work. –  Speed Mar 12 '13 at 18:28
    
alright, here's your fixed version. –  Speed Mar 12 '13 at 18:29
1  
Thanks man. This was really frustrating and I had no clue what I was messing up with. Sloppy code but I guess it'll only improve :) –  Alex Morris Mar 12 '13 at 18:29
2  
You should use p instead of puts if you wish to only inspect the array, it gets printed as it would look in ruby code instead of printing each element individually. –  Speed Mar 12 '13 at 18:31

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