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Is there any way of finding out the start of a loop in a link list using not more than two pointers? I do not want to visit every node and mark it seen and reporting the first node already been seen.Is there any other way to do this?

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is this homework? –  Peter Oct 8 '09 at 10:32
    
Has this been asked before? google.com/… –  Josh Lee Oct 8 '09 at 10:33

12 Answers 12

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I have heard this exact question as an interview quiz question.

The most elegant solution is:

Put both pointers at the first element (call them A and B)

Then keep looping::

  • Advance A to the next element
  • Advance A to the next element again
  • Advance B to the next element
Every time you update a pointer, check if A and B are identical. If at some point pointers A and B are identical, then you have a loop. Problem with this approach is that you may end up moving around the loop twice, but no more than twice with pointer A

If you want to actually find the element that has two pointers pointing to it, that is more difficult. I'd go out of a limb and say its impossible to do with just two pointers unless you are willing to repeat following the linked list a large number of times.

The most efficient way of doing it with more memory, would be to put the pointers to the elements in and array, sort it, and then look for a repeat.

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this is called the "Floyd's cycle detection algorithm" aka "The tortoise and hare" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cycle_detection#Tortoise_and_hare –  Kimvais Oct 8 '09 at 10:37
    
The solution by balki finds it using only two pointers and just looping the list few times. –  parapura rajkumar Jul 26 '11 at 15:57

Step1: Proceed in the usual way u'll use to find the loop. ie. Have two pointers, increment one in single step and other in two steps, If they both meet in sometime, there is a loop.

Step2: Freeze one pointer where it was and increment the other pointer in one step counting the steps u make and when they both meet again, the count will give u the length of the loop.(This is same as counting the number of elements in a circular link list.)

Step3: Reset both pointers to the start of the link list, increment one pointer to the length of loop times and then start the second pointer. increment both pointers in one step and when they meet again, it'll be the start of the loop. (This is same as finding the nth element from the end of the link list.)

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very well written !! Thank you a lot –  MemoryLeaks Nov 24 '12 at 13:17
    
Thought about solving this for a bit (not that long I guess, just around 5 min), then I decided I should read the answer and after reading this it just seems so easy!!! Love/Hate these kind of questions. –  Robert Noack Oct 28 '13 at 5:36
    
Excellent!!!! I've been thinking about it all night... –  Garnel Nov 20 '14 at 13:44
    
The second step is totally unnecessary. Instead, after the first step you can reset only one pointer to the head of the list, and then increment both pointers one step at a time, and again, when they meet, it'll be the start of the loop. –  Yaniv Jan 26 at 6:20

MATHEMATICAL PROOF + THE SOLUTION

Let 'k' be the number of steps from HEADER to BEGINLOOP.
Let 'm' be the number of steps from HEADER to MEETPOINT.
Let 'n' be the number of steps in the loop.
Also, consider two pointers 'P' and 'Q'. Q having 2x speed than P.

SIMPLE CASE: When k < N

When pointer 'P' would be at BEGINLOOP (i.e. it would have traveled 'k' steps), Q would have traveled '2k' steps. So, effectively, Q is ahead of '2k-k = k' steps from P when P enters the loop, and hence, Q is 'n-k' steps behind the BEGINLOOP now.

When P would have moved from BEGINLOOP to MEETPONT, it would have traveled 'm-k' steps. In that time, Q would have traveled '2(m-k)' steps. But, since they met, and Q started 'n-k' steps behind the BEGINLOOP, so, effectively, '2(m-k) - (n-k)' should be equal to '(m-k)' So,

=> 2m - 2k - n + k = m - k
=> 2m - n = m
=> n = m

THAT MEANS, P and Q meet at the point equal to the number of steps (or multiple to be general, see the case mentioned below) in the loop. Now, at the MEETPOINT, both P and Q are 'n-(m-k)' steps behind, i.e, 'k' steps behind ,as we saw n=m. So, if we start P from HEADER again, and Q from the MEETPOINT but this time with the pace equal to P, P and Q will now be meeting at BEGINLOOP only.

GENERAL CASE: Say, k = nX + Y, Y < n (Hence, k%n = Y)

When pointer 'P' would be at BEGINLOOP (i.e. it would have traveled 'k' steps), Q would have traveled '2k' steps. So, effectively, Q is ahead of '2k-k = k' steps from P when P enters the loop. But, please note 'k' is greater than 'n', which means Q would have made multiple rounds of the loop. So, effectively, Q is 'n-(k%n)' steps behind the BEGINLOOP now.

When P would have moved from BEGINLOOP to MEETPOINT, it would have traveled 'm-k' steps. (Hence, effectively, MEETPOINT would be at '(m-k)%n' steps ahead of BEGINLOOP now.) In that time, Q would have traveled '2(m-k)' steps. But, since they met, and Q started 'n-(k%n)' steps behind the BEGINLOOP, so, effectively, new position of Q (which is '(2(m-k) - (n-k/%n))%n' from BEGINLOOP) should be equal to the new position of P (which is '(m-k)%n' from BEGIN LOOP).

So,

=> (2(m - k) - (n - k%n))%n = (m - k)%n
=> (2(m - k) - (n - k%n))%n = m%n - k%n
=> (2(m - k) - (n - Y))%n = m%n - Y   (as k%n = Y)
=> 2m%n - 2k%n - n%n + Y%n = m%n - Y
=> 2m%n - Y - 0 + Y = m%n - Y    (Y%n = Y as Y < n)
=> m%n = 0
=> 'm' should be multiple of 'n'
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Now I like this answer more! –  Robert Noack Oct 28 '13 at 6:19
1  
Thanks a lot for the wonderful answer!!! –  Vikram Nov 15 '13 at 23:43
    
@pikooz, Is this proof true for any value of n, m and k? –  Vikram Nov 18 '13 at 23:01
    
@pikoooz, Suppose, if the loop begins after 1000 nodes. Hence, k=1000. If loop is very small, say of 4 nodes. Hence, n = 4. Hence, m will also be greater than 1000. So, how will n = m in this case? (Please correct me if I have gone wrong somewhere). –  Vikram Nov 18 '13 at 23:07
    
@Vikram, thanks for pointing that out! I've updated my answer. See, if that makes sense now. –  pikoooz Nov 25 '13 at 6:51

Proceed in the usual way you will use to find the loop. ie. Have two pointers, increment one in single step(slowPointer) and other in two steps(fastPointer), If they both meet in sometime, there is a loop.

As you might would have already realized that meeting point is k Step before the head of the loop.

where k is size of non-looped part of the list.

now move slow to head of the loop

keep Fast at collision point

each of them are k STep from the loop start (Slow from start of the list where as fast is k step before the head of the loop- Draw the pic to get the clarity)

Now move them at same speed - They must meet at loop start

eg

slow=head
while (slow!=fast)
{
     slow=slow.next;
     fast=fast.next;
}
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There are two way to find the loops in a link list. 1. Use two pointer one advance one step and other advance two steps if there is loop, in some point both pointer get the same value and never reach to null. But if there is no loop pointer reaches to null in one point and both pointer never get the same value. But in this approach we can get there is a loop in the link list but we can't tell where exactly starting the loop. This is not the efficient way as well.

  1. Use a hash function in such a way that the value should be unique. Incase if we are trying to insert the duplicate it should through the exception. Then travel through each node and push the address into the hash. If the pointer reach to null and no exception from the hash means there is no cycle in the link list. If we are getting any exception from hash means there is a cycle in the list and that is the link from which the cycle is starting.
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Well I tried a way by using one pointer... I tried the method in several data sets.... As the memory for each of the nodes of a linked list are allocated in an increasing order, so while traversing the linked list from the head of the linked list, if the address of a node becomes larger than the address of the node it is pointing to, we can determine there is a loop, as well as the beginning element of the loop.

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In general case this (address increase with N) is not guaranteed, so your method wouldn't work. –  Zar Shardan Jan 11 '13 at 2:50

Refer to this link for comprehensive answer

http://umairsaeed.com/2011/06/23/finding-the-start-of-a-loop-in-a-circular-linked-list/

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I too had this bookmarked but now link seems broken? –  Hari Feb 28 at 14:32

This is code to find start of loop in linked List :

public static void findStartOfLoop(Node n) {

    Node fast, slow;
    fast = slow = n;
    do {
        fast = fast.next.next;
        slow = slow.next;
    } while (fast != slow);       

    fast = n;
    do {
        fast = fast.next;
        slow = slow.next;
    }while (fast != slow);

    System.out.println(" Start of Loop : " + fast.v);
}
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  1. Proceed in the usual way you will use to find the loop. ie. Have two pointers, increment one in single step and other in two steps, If they both meet in sometime, there is a loop.

  2. Keep one of the pointers fixed get the total number of nodes in the loop say L.

  3. Now from this point(increment second pointer to the next node in the loop) in the loop reverse the linked list and count the number of nodes traversed, say X.

  4. Now using the second pointer(loop is broken) from the same point in the loop travrse the linked list and count the number of nodes remaining say Y

  5. The loop begins after the ((X+Y)-L)\2 nodes. Or it starts at the (((X+Y)-L)\2+1)th node.

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  1. Proceed in the usual way you will use to find the loop. ie. Have two pointers, increment one in single step and other in two steps, If they both meet in sometime, there is a loop.

  2. Keep one of the pointers fixed get the total number of nodes in the loop say L.

  3. Now from this point(increment second pointer to the next node in the loop) in the loop reverse the linked list and count the number of nodes traversed, say X.

  4. Now using the second pointer(loop is broken) from the same point in the loop travrse the linked list and count the number of nodes remaining say Y

  5. The loop begins after the ((X+Y)-L)\2 nodes. Or it starts at the (((X+Y)-L)\2+1)th node.

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The best answer I have found was here:
tianrunhe: find-loop-starting-point-in-a-circular-linked-list

  • 'm' being distance between HEAD and START_LOOP
  • 'L' being loop length
  • 'd' being distance between MEETING_POINT and START_LOOP
  • p1 moving at V, and p2 moving at 2*V

    when the 2 pointers meet: distance run is = m+ n*L -d = 2*(m+ L -d)

    => which means (not mathematicaly demonstrated here) that if p1 starts from HEAD & p2 starts from MEETING_POINT & they move at same pace, they will meet @ START_LOOP

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Supposing the hash function is also O(n) let it be : (%n)

  1. Proceed in the usual way you will use to find the loop. ie. Have two pointers, increment one in single step and other in two steps, If they both meet in sometime, there is a loop.

  2. Traverse the loop once again with one of those pointers. This time, keep adding the addresses of the pointers to a hash table.

  3. Traverse the list once again from the beginning. This time also keep adding the addresses to the hash table. When the first collision occurs in the hashing, that address will correspond to the start of the loop.

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