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I was trying the std::map (in MinGW and MSVC2008), I used the following code:

#include <map>
#include <string.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class MapManager
{public:
    void insert(char* n){
        cout << "Inserting " <<  n << endl;
        m_map[n] = 0;}
    void get(char* n){
        cout << "Finding (" << n << ")" << endl;
        int x = m_map[n];}
    struct cmp_str{
       bool operator()(char const *a, char const *b){
           cout << "operator(" << a << " " << b << ")\n";
           return strcmp(a, b) < 0;}
    };
    std::map<char*,int,cmp_str> m_map;
};
int main(){
    MapManager m;
    m.insert("Abc"); m.insert("Xyz"); m.insert("123"); m.insert("987"); 
    m.get("Abc"); m.get("Xyz");
 }

The result is as follows:

Inserting Abc
Inserting Xyz
operator(Abc Xyz)
operator(Xyz Abc)
operator(Abc Xyz)
operator(Xyz Abc)
Inserting 123
operator(Abc 123)
operator(123 Abc)
operator(123 Abc)
operator(Abc 123)
Inserting 987
operator(Abc 987)
operator(123 987)
operator(987 123)
operator(987 Abc)
operator(987 Abc)
operator(Abc 987)
operator(123 987)
operator(987 123)
Finding (Abc)
operator(Abc Abc)
operator(123 Abc)
operator(Abc 123)
operator(987 Abc)
operator(Abc 987)
operator(Abc Abc)
Finding (Xyz)
operator(Abc Xyz)
operator(Xyz Abc)
operator(Xyz Xyz)
operator(Xyz Xyz)

It is strange that Inserting Xyz requires 4 calls for comparison!

operator(Abc Xyz)
operator(Xyz Abc)
operator(Abc Xyz)
operator(Xyz Abc)

What is the algorithm which map uses to insert/find entries?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's implementation-dependent, the only requirement is that both insert and find/[] must be O(log n).* Typically it's an insertion/search on a red-black tree, which may not be perfectly balanced.

(Note that as std::map is a template, all the implementation details will be in header files that you can peruse...)


* For this use-case, at least.

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