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I have a function which is applied on each element of a 2D array (double[,]), but only along a given dimension.

I had to create two functions because I don't know how to pass the desired dimension to the method as a parameter. I ended up with a "vertical_foo" and a "horizontal_foo" functions, which are almost identical to each other:

private double[,] vertical_foo (double[,] a) {

    int height = a.GetLength(0);
    int width = a.GetLength(1);          

    var result = new double[height, weight];

    for (int i = 0; i < height; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < width; j++) {

            // Here I use first ("i") dimension
            int before =  Math.Max(i-1, 0);
            int after = Math.Min(i+1, height-1);
            result[i,j] = (a[after, j] - a[before, j]) * 0.5;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

private double[,] horizontal_foo (double[,] a) {

    int height = a.GetLength(0);
    int width = a.GetLength(1);          

    var result = new double[height, weight];

    for (int i = 0; i < height; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < width; j++) {

            // Here I use second ("j") dimension
            int before =  Math.Max(j-1, 0);
            int after = Math.Min(j+1, height-1);
            result[i,j] = (a[i, after] - a[i, before]) * 0.5;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

I would like to have a signature like this, where the second parameter is the dimension on which I want to apply the indexing:

private double[,] general_foo (double[,] a, int dimension) {}

Any suggestion is much welcome!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'll take a stab at this:

private double[,] general_foo(double[,] a, int dimension)
{
    var w = a.GetLength(0);
    var h = a.GetLength(1);
    var result = new double[w, h];
    var otherDimension = 1 - dimension; // NOTE only works for 2D arrays
    var otherDimensionLength = a.GetLength(otherDimension);
    var dimensionLength = a.GetLength(dimension);
    for (int i = 0; i < dimensionLength; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < otherDimensionLength; j++)
        {
            var setIndexes = new int[2] { j, j };
            setIndexes[dimension] = i;

            var beforeIndexes = new int[2] { j, j };
            beforeIndexes[dimension] = Math.Max(i - 1, 0);

            var afterIndexes = new int[2] { j, j };
            afterIndexes[dimension] = Math.Min(i + 1, dimensionLength - 1);

            var beforeValue = (double)a.GetValue(beforeIndexes);
            var afterValue = (double)a.GetValue(afterIndexes);
            result.SetValue((afterValue - beforeValue) * 0.5, setIndexes);
        }
    }

    return result;
} 

Here's a more generic method. It uses a few lambdas, so the it might also help you understand the use of lambdas a bit also.

// Iterates through every item in a multidementional array array
private Array MutateArray<T>(Array a, Func<T, int[], T> selector)
{
    var rank = a.Rank;
    var lengths = Enumerable.Range(0, a.Rank)
                            .Select(r => a.GetLength(r))
                            .ToArray(); // Get length of a in each dimension
    var result = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(T), lengths);
    var index = new int[a.Rank];
    foreach (T item in a) // flattens array
    {
        result.SetValue(selector(item, index), index);

        // Get next index value (I'm sure this could be improved)
        for (var d = 0; d < rank; d++)
        {
            if (index[d] == lengths[d] - 1)
            {
                index[d] = 0;
            }
            else
            {
                index[d]++;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}

// Your "foo" method
private double[,] generic_foo(double[,] a, int d)
{
    var upperD = a.GetUpperBound(d);
    return (double[,])MutateArray<double>(a, (x, i) =>
    {
        var prev = i.ToArray(); // clone
        prev[d] = Math.Max(prev[d] - 1, 0);

        var next = i.ToArray(); // clone
        next[d] = Math.Min(next[d] + 1, upperD);

        var prevVal = (double)a.GetValue(prev);
        var nextVal = (double)a.GetValue(next);
        return (nextVal - prevVal) * 0.5;
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! Looks like GetValue() and SetValue() are doing the trick here. And it seems to me that these methods can be further elaborated to achieve Numpy-like slicing abilities, perhaps with extension methods. (I am new to C#, but have used Numpy a lot) –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 19:41
    
Yeah your question got me thinking to see if I can create a general n-dimensional version of this. I'll update soon. –  p.s.w.g Mar 12 '13 at 19:44
    
This is a discrete gradient function, with identical results compared to numpy.gradient(). The source code of this function uses slice objects analog to the arrays passed to Get/SetValue(). I'll look for some link to this source code. –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 19:54
    
(it's in the line 832 of this file: github.com/numpy/numpy/blob/master/numpy/lib/function_base.py) –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 19:59
    
I accepted the answer, my code is working correctly with your method. Thanks! –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 20:14

Would it be acceptable to do something along these lines?

int before_i = i, after_i = i;
int before_j = j, after_j = j;
switch( dimension ) {
   case 0:
      before_i = Math.max(i-1,0);
      after_i = Math.min(i+1, width-1);
      break;
   case 1:
      before_j = Math.max(j-1,0);
      after_j = Math.min(j+1, height-1);
      break;
}
result[ i, j ] = (a[after_i, after_j] - a[before_i,before_j]) * 0.5

It's not terribly pretty, but at least this way you don't need two functions.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually prettier than it looks, indeed, but I still have the impression that it is possible to do it arithmetically rather than logically. Take a look at PSWG answer, that seems to be along a good direction... –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 19:37

You could pass in a delegate to extract the dimension you're interested in? (or a lambda)

Func<int[,],int,int[]> accessor here indicates the signature of a function (where the last template parameter is the return type)

   private void Working()
   {
       DoSomething(GetRow,1);

   }

So, in this example, you want the "DoSomething" worker to work on a row.

    private void DoSomething(Func<int[,],int,int[]> accessor, int Idx)
   { 
       int[,] theData = {{1,1,1,1,1},{2,2,2,2,2}};           
       int[] someData = accessor(theData,Idx);
   }


   public int[] GetRow(int[,] data,int index)
   {
       List<int> numbers = new List<int>();

       for (int i = 0; i < data.GetLength(1); i++)
       {
           numbers.Add(data[index, i]);
       }
       return numbers.ToArray();
   }

In the above example, you get a one dimensional array of 2,2,2,2,2

I'm addressing the general case of extracting a particular part of a multidimensional array here... The method/ lambda you pass in extracts the meaningful part of data...

share|improve this answer
    
That might be actually a killer solution, but it is too esoterical for my current understanding, unfortunately... Also, it's not exactely readable (at least not for me) :( –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 19:34
    
Edited, simplified (removed lambda stuff which was obviously clouding the issue a little) –  Immortal Blue Mar 12 '13 at 19:53
    
This whole stuff about delegates and lambdas is something that I will eventually put my hands on, but I'm afraid I'll go for the pedestrian way for now. Thanks anyway, and this answer will probably help me and probably someone else in the near future! –  heltonbiker Mar 12 '13 at 20:03
    
It's really not as scary as it looks. Basically you are passing the method in as a parameter, then using that method inside your worker to extract the data that you're interested in. The above example extracts a row from the given data set. If you wanted to extract a column, you would write a new method, with the same signature, but get it to extract the column (swap the index and i in the loop;) ) –  Immortal Blue Mar 12 '13 at 20:05

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