Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Okay all you ctypes gurus out there...

I've got a python script that reads a memory address a hundred times a second. The value stored at this memory address represents an unsigned integer. This value increases over time. Unfortunately, when it passes 2^8, 2^16, or 2^24, the ReadProcessMemory call does not read enough bytes to get the larger integer. In fact, it appears to not read the correct amount of bytes after the first read.

Here is the code snippet:

from time import sleep
from ctypes import *
from struct import *
pid = 0x0D50
op = windll.kernel32.OpenProcess
rpm = windll.kernel32.ReadProcessMemory
ch = windll.kernel32.CloseHandle
PAA = 0x1F0FFF
addy = 0x38D53368
ph = op(PAA,False,int(pid)) #program handle
lastvalue = 0
while True:
   datadummy = b'.'*4
   buff = c_char_p(datadummy)
   bufferSize = (len(buff.value))
   bytesRead = c_ulong(0)

   if rpm(ph,addy,buff,bufferSize,byref(bytesRead)):
       value = unpack('I',datadummy)[0]
       if lastvalue != value:
           print value
           print bytesRead
           lastvalue = value
   sleep(.01)

And the output might be something like:

191
c_ulong(4L) ////Here it got 4 bytes like I expected
211
c_ulong(1L) ////But here it only got 1 byte.?? It should be reading 4 bytes everytime
231
c_ulong(1L) 
251
c_ulong(1L)
15           ////This value is incorrect, because it only reads 1 byte. (should be 271)
c_ulong(1L)

What it seems to me is that it is only reading the number of bytes that the previous call needed to read...

How can I fix this?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The expression b'.'*4 created the constant '....' in the code object for your module. This constant is an object like any other in Python, except it's supposed to be immutable. You violated that assumption by using ctypes. For example:

>>> from ctypes import *
>>> def f():
...   s = b'.'*4
...   buf = c_char_p(s)
...   memset(buf, 0, 1)
... 
>>> f.__code__.co_consts
(None, '.', 4, 0, 1, '....')
>>> c_char_p(f.__code__.co_consts[5]).value
'....'

>>> f() # set the first character to "\x00"
>>> f.__code__.co_consts
(None, '.', 4, 0, 1, '\x00...')
>>> c_char_p(f.__code__.co_consts[5]).value
''

The value descriptor of a c_char_p expects the buffer to be a null-terminated string. With the first byte mutated to 0, value returns an empty string. Now look at the value of 191 packed as a little-endian, unsigned long:

>>> import struct
>>> struct.pack("<L", 191)
'\xbf\x00\x00\x00'

That should explain why bufferSize became 1 on the 2nd pass.

If the string had been interned, you could either crash the interpreter or render it unusable. Most strings used within the CPython API are interned, as are names of modules, classes, functions, attributes, and variables. For example:

>>> from ctypes import *
>>> import numbers
>>> s = 'numbers'
>>> b = c_char_p(s)
>>> r = memset(b, 100, 1)
>>> s
'dumbers'

>>> numbers.Number
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'numbers' is not defined

>>> globals()[s].Number
<class 'numbers.Number'>

create_string_buffer is a convenience function to create and set a char array in one pass:

>>> b1 = create_string_buffer('test1')
>>> type(b1)
<class 'ctypes.c_char_Array_6'>
>>> b1.value
'test1'

>>> b2 = (c_char * 6)()
>>> b2.value = 'test2'
>>> type(b2)
<class 'ctypes.c_char_Array_6'>
>>> b2.value
'test2'
>>> b2.raw
'test2\x00'

You could also have passed a reference to an unsigned long instead:

value = c_ulong() 
bytesRead = c_ulong()
rpm(ph, addy, byref(value), sizeof(value), byref(bytesRead))

Another example violating the immutability assumption. Integers less than 256 are cached, i.e. code that uses them always refers to the same set of objects. So if you mutate one of them, it affects the entire system:

>>> offset = sizeof(c_size_t)*2
>>> addr = id(200) + offset
>>> n = c_int.from_address(addr)
>>> n
c_long(200)
>>> n.value = 2000000
>>> 
>>> 200 + 1
2000001
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer! Thanks for the detailed explanation of what went on. –  Dream Lane Mar 13 '13 at 21:25

Okay, well I figured it out. I needed to use ctypes.create_string_buffer(init_or_size[, size]) instead of the c_char_p that I tried.

The working code:

from time import sleep
from ctypes import *
from struct import *
pid = 0x0D50
op = windll.kernel32.OpenProcess
rpm = windll.kernel32.ReadProcessMemory
ch = windll.kernel32.CloseHandle
PAA = 0x1F0FFF
addy = 0x543A88F0
ph = op(PAA,False,int(pid)) #program handle
lastvalue = 0
while True:

   buff = create_string_buffer(4)
   bufferSize = (sizeof(buff))
   bytesRead = c_ulong(0)

   if rpm(ph,addy,buff,bufferSize,byref(bytesRead)):
       value = unpack('I',buff)[0]
       if lastvalue != value:
           print value
           print bytesRead
           lastvalue = value
   sleep(.01)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.