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We have inherited a project that runs on Ruby. Nobody here codes in Ruby, so we have decided to convert it to Java. I'm running into an issue and can't quite figure out what this code is doing.

def createStrings(str)
  data, dict, indexDict = [], {}, {}

  @sections.each{|section| data << section.restrictions << section.notes << section.comment << section.prerequisites}
  @termCourses.each{|course| data << course.credits << course.description }
  data.each{|str| dict[str] ||= 0; dict[str] += 1}

  dict.reject{|word, count| count <= 1}.map{|word, count| word}.each_with_index{|word, index| indexDict[word] = index}

  str << "d.strings = [#{indexDict.map{|word, index| "'#{e(word)}'"}.join(',')}];"
  str << "var strings = d.strings; var #{STRINGS} = d.strings;"

  indexDict
end

If anyone could please convert this method to Java, I'd greatly appreciate it.

Edit

private String strings(List<FullCourse> courseSections) {
    for(FullCourse fc : courseSections) {
        String restrictions = fc.getRestrictions();
        if(restrictions != null) 
            restrictions = restrictions.replaceAll("(\\')", "\\\\'").replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n");
        if(!sectionData.contains(restrictions) && restrictions != null)
            sectionData.add(restrictions);

        String notes = fc.getNotes();
        if(notes != null) 
            notes = notes.replaceAll("(\\')", "\\\\'").replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n");
        if(!sectionData.contains(notes) && notes != null)
            sectionData.add(notes);

        String comment = fc.getComment();
        if(comment != null) 
            comment = comment.replaceAll("(\\')", "\\\\'").replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n");
        if(!sectionData.contains(comment) && comment != null)
            sectionData.add(comment);

        String prereq = fc.getPrerequisites();
        if(prereq != null) 
            prereq = prereq.replaceAll("(\\')", "\\\\'").replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n");
        if(!sectionData.contains(prereq) && prereq != null)
            sectionData.add(prereq);

        String credits = fc.getCourse().getCredits();
        if(!courseData.contains(credits) && credits != null){
            credits = credits.replaceAll("(\\')", "\\\\'").replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n");
            courseData.add(credits.trim());
        }

        String description = fc.getCourse().getDescription();
        if(!courseData.contains(description) && description != null) {
            description = description.replaceAll("(\\')", "\\\\'").replaceAll("\\n", "\\\\n");
            courseData.add(description.trim());
        }
    }

    combined.addAll(sectionData);
    combined.addAll(courseData);

    String strings = "d.strings = [";
    for(String s : combined) {
        strings += "'" + s + "'";
    }

    strings += "];\n";
    strings += "var strings = d.strings; var g = d.strings;\n";
    return strings;
}

This is the code I've written. It produces something similar, but not exactly the same.

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closed as not a real question by maerics, Zach Kemp, the Tin Man, Justin Ko, Kevin Bedell Mar 12 '13 at 20:43

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Please read the stackoverflow.com/about to understand how the site works. Then this might also be helpful: whathaveyoutried.com –  fmendez Mar 12 '13 at 20:06
2  
You are asking us to write code for you for free. I assume you work in a company earning a wage, and would then turn around and use that code in a program that you are supposed to have written. Does that really seem right? –  the Tin Man Mar 12 '13 at 20:19

1 Answer 1

Not going to write code for you, but I'll tell you what it does:

data = []
@sections.each{|section| data << section.restrictions << section.notes << section.comment << section.prerequisites}
@termCourses.each{|course| data << course.credits << course.description }

Go through this.sections and this.termCourses (class variables) and add restrictions, notes, comments, prerequisites, credits and description to an array.

dict = {}
data.each{|str| dict[str] ||= 0; dict[str] += 1}

data is now a List<String> containing all info. The occurrences of each string in data are now counted using a Map<String, Integer>.

indexDict = {}
dict.reject{|word, count| count <= 1}.map{|word, count| word}.each_with_index{|word, index| indexDict[word] = index}

Only the words that showed up more than once are put into a new List<String>, and a new Map<String, Integer> is created to keep track of what index in the new list each word is.

str << "d.strings = [#{indexDict.map{|word, index| "'#{e(word)}'"}.join(',')}];"
str << "var strings = d.strings; var #{STRINGS} = d.strings;"

The String passed in to the overall method is appended to with what appears to be generated JavaScript. What is appended is the code for an array containing each word in last List, but with method e called on it.

indexDict

The Map<String, Integer> with the indeces is returned.

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could you join here? chat please. –  Arup Rakshit Mar 12 '13 at 20:23

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