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The goal of my program is to look thru a string and be able to take out the dialog question and answers.

For example: ("do you like me?" ("yes" ("we're friends")) ("no" ("i hate you")) )

The program would take out "do you like me?" and would give you the choices to enter yes or no. Once you choose the respective selection, it would throw out either "we're friends" or "i hate you."

Is there any libraries or any solutions on how to do this?

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5  
What have you tried? mattgemmell.com/2008/12/08/what-have-you-tried –  Kay Mar 12 '13 at 20:04
2  
Kay, you got nice url! I'll save it :) –  troyane Mar 12 '13 at 20:06
3  
@troyane (and also @Kay) So nice the author sprang for a domain: whathaveyoutried.com –  iamnotmaynard Mar 12 '13 at 20:09
1  
@troyane: I've registered bobby-tables.com and htmlparsing.com for the same reason: I keep posting the same answers over and over and over here on SO. –  Andy Lester Mar 12 '13 at 20:49
2  
@troyane Here's one site I've created: emclstcd.tk –  user529758 Mar 15 '13 at 20:46

2 Answers 2

Correct me if I'm wrong, but a Lisp parser would do the job pretty well. :P Seriously, this looks like nicely parenthesized lists of strings or other parenthesized expressions. A simple recursive parser is enough, just invent a data structure to be created as the parse tree that suits your needs.

Edit: Damnit, I finally managed to do it... Huh, it's not quite a trivial task to whip up even a very simple parser correctly between 10pm and 12pm, I must admit.

/*
 * lrparser.c
 * LR-parser
 * A recursive Lisp-subset parser
 * that has a misleading name (it's not an LALR, but a recursive descent one).
 *
 * Originally written to answer
 * http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15371008/string-processing-in-c/
 *
 * Made in some *really* bored hours by Árpád Goreity (H2CO3)
 * on 12-03-2013
 *
 * Language: C99 (not sure if POSIX)
 */

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <assert.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

// AST node type
enum {
    NODE_STRING,
    NODE_LIST
};

// Permitted tokens
enum {
    TOKEN_INVALID   = -1,
    TOKEN_LPAREN    =  0,
    TOKEN_RPAREN,
    TOKEN_STRING,
    TOKEN_END
};

// Useful for debugging and error reporting
static const char *toknames[] = {
    "Left paren",
    "Right paren",
    "String",
    "End"
};

// ...Or simply an AST node...
struct ParseTree {
    int type; // string or list
    char *string; // if any
    struct ParseTree **children;
    size_t n_children;
};

// Construct a node structure from a type and any necessary data
static struct ParseTree *node_new(int type, ...)
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, type);
    struct ParseTree *node = malloc(sizeof(*node));
    assert(node != NULL);

    node->type = type;
    if (type == NODE_STRING) {
        /* If the node is a string, fill it
         * (ownership transfer: the argument will be
         * free()'d by the node_free() function)
         */
        node->string = va_arg(args, char *);
    }

    node->children = NULL;
    node->n_children = 0;

    va_end(args);

    return node;
}

void node_free(struct ParseTree *tree)
{
    switch (tree->type) {
    case NODE_STRING:
        free(tree->string);
        break;
    case NODE_LIST:
        for (int i = 0; i < tree->n_children; i++) {
            node_free(tree->children[i]);
        }
        free(tree->children);
        break;
    default:
        fprintf(stderr, "Warning: unknown node type %d\n", tree->type);
        break;
    }

    free(tree);
}

// Sorry, the usual logarithmic storage expansion is omitted for clarity
void node_add(struct ParseTree *parent, struct ParseTree *child)
{
    assert(parent != NULL);
    assert(child != NULL);

    parent->n_children++;
    parent->children = realloc(parent->children, sizeof(parent->children[0]) * parent->n_children);
    // Lazy error checking: assert() instead of compare to NULL
    assert(parent->children != NULL);
    parent->children[parent->n_children - 1] = child;
}

// Just in order to break thread safety
static const char *s = NULL; // the string to be parsed
static char *curstr = NULL; // the contents of the string value of the current token
static int curtok; // the current token

// The tokenizer
static int lex()
{
    // Whitespace doesn't matter
    while (isspace(s[0])) {
        s++;
    }

    // end of string
    if (s[0] == 0) {
        return TOKEN_END;
    }

    // The followin four are obvious
    if (s[0] == '(') {
        s++;
        return curtok = TOKEN_LPAREN;
    }

    if (s[0] == ')') {
        s++;
        return curtok = TOKEN_RPAREN;
    }

    if (s[0] == '"') {
        const char *begin = s;
        while (*++s != '"')
            ;

        size_t sz = s - begin - 2 + 1;
        curstr = malloc(sz + 1);
        memcpy(curstr, begin + 1, sz);
        curstr[sz] = 0;

        // skip trailing quotation mark (")
        s++;
        return curtok = TOKEN_STRING;
    }

    return curtok = TOKEN_INVALID;
}

void expect(int tok)
{
    if (curtok != tok) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Error: expected token %s, got %s\n", toknames[tok], toknames[curtok]);
        abort();
    }

    lex();
}

// a. k. a. "parse()"
// Simple recursive (one-level...) descent (root == list) approach
static struct ParseTree *recurse_and_descend()
{
    expect(TOKEN_LPAREN);       

    struct ParseTree *node = node_new(NODE_LIST);

    struct ParseTree *child;
    while (curtok != TOKEN_RPAREN) {
        if (curtok == TOKEN_LPAREN) {
            child = recurse_and_descend();
        } else if (curtok == TOKEN_STRING) {
            child = node_new(NODE_STRING, curstr);
            lex();
        } else {
            fprintf(stderr, "Unexpected token '%s'\n", toknames[curtok]);
            // lazy programmer's safety system, let the kernel do the dirty work
            abort();
        }
        node_add(node, child);
    }

    expect(TOKEN_RPAREN);

    return node;
}

static struct ParseTree *parse(const char *str)
{
    s = str; // poor man's initialization
    lex(); // The first breath of fresh token makes the baby's heart beat
    return recurse_and_descend(); // Let's do the Harlem shake!
}

// petite helper function
static void dump_indent(int indent)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < indent; i++) {
        printf("\t");
    }
}

// Because 0x7f502a00 is not very meaningful for the human eye
static void dump_tree(struct ParseTree *tree, int indent)
{
    dump_indent(indent);

    switch (tree->type) {
    case NODE_STRING:
        printf("<String \"%s\">\n", tree->string);
        break;
    case NODE_LIST:
        printf("<List>\n");
        for (int i = 0; i < tree->n_children; i++) {
            dump_tree(tree->children[i], indent + 1);
        }
        break;
    default:
        printf("Unknown node\n");
        break;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    struct ParseTree *tree = parse(argv[1]);
    dump_tree(tree, 0);
    node_free(tree);

    return 0;
}

Usage:

h2co3-macbook:~ h2co3$ ./lrparser "(\"do you like me?\" (\"yes\" (\"we're friends\")) (\"no\" (\"i hate you\" \"me too\")) )"
<List>
    <String "do you like me?">
    <List>
        <String "yes">
        <List>
            <String "we're friends">
    <List>
        <String "no">
        <List>
            <String "i hate you">
            <String "me too">
share|improve this answer
2  
@EdS. Thanks :D But seriously, doesn't this look like a proper subset of Common Lisp? –  user529758 Mar 12 '13 at 20:10
2  
@EdwinBuck And that's what I'm here for ;-) –  user529758 Mar 12 '13 at 20:32
1  
Well, just submit your lisp parser in C, and the question will be fully answered. :) –  Edwin Buck Mar 12 '13 at 20:33
2  
@EdwinBuck You see I did it, right? :P –  user529758 Mar 12 '13 at 23:10
2  
Not to be negative here or anything but technically it's not a LISP parser, it's an S-expression de-serializer. I like it though, it's a very nice and under-rated data exchange format +1 :) –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jul 8 '13 at 0:52

If you want "something that works" but isn't robust, lots of tricks work. If you really want it to work, you need to study a bit up on LALR(1) parsers, and then decide if this is simple enough to roll your own parser (it is) or if you want to use something like YACC.

The Context Free Grammar for this seems to look like

QUESTION => '(' '"' TEXT '"' RESPONSES ')'
RESPONSES => null | RESPONSE RESPONSES
RESPONSE => '(' '"' TEXT '(' '"' TEXT '"' ')' ')'
TEXT => all characters except '(' '"' ')'

Then you analyze which combinations of the above language can result in changes in processing. Basically RESPONSES can resduce to nothing or something that starts with a '(', which means that at that point in processing, you can tell the difference between needing to parse a new RESPONSE or the end of the QUESTION by seeing if the lookahead (not yet parsed character) is '(' or ')'.

The parsing within a mode is quite simple. If the character is fixed, just check that it matches what is expected, and advance the index of parsed elements. If the character is not fixed (like in text) use a routine to check it is bounds, and anything out of what is expected should put the parser in an error state.

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As this is of course the "way to do", I think it will hardly help a C beginner to understand the world of string parsing : / –  D.R. Mar 12 '13 at 20:36
    
@D.R. Well, we all have to start somewhere. The simplest answers already cover the hacks which will work, yet leave no mention of the foundational elements. –  Edwin Buck Mar 12 '13 at 20:40

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