Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to write a kernel in that calculates the sum of the inverse of the distance between N given points over N. A serial coda in C would be like

    average = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < Np; i++){
    for(int j = i + 1; j < Np; j++){
        average += 1.0e0f/sqrtf((rx[i]-rx[j])*(rx[i]-rx[j]) + (ry[i]-ry[j])*(ry[i]-ry[j]));
    }
}
average = average/(float)N;

Where rx and ry are the x and y coordinates, respectively.

I generate the points via a kernel that uses random number generator. For the kernel, I used 128(256) threads per block for 4k(8k) points. On it every thread performs the inner above inner loop, then the results are passed to a reduce sum function, as follows

Generate points:

__global__ void InitRNG ( curandState * state, const int seed ){
    int tIdx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    curand_init (seed, tIdx, 0, &state[tIdx]);
}

__global__
void SortPoints(float* X, float* Y,const int N, curandState *state){

    float rdmn1, rdmn2;

    unsigned int tIdx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    float range;
    if(tIdx < N){
        rdmn1 = curand_uniform(&state[tIdx]);
        rdmn2 = curand_uniform(&state[tIdx]);
        range = sqrtf(0.25e0f*N*rdmn1);
            X[tIdx] = range*cosf(2.0e0f*pi*rdmn2);
            Y[tIdx] = range*sinf(2.0e0f*pi*rdmn2);
    }
}

Reduction:

__device__
float ReduceSum2(float In){

    __shared__ float data[BlockSize];

    unsigned int tIdx = threadIdx.x;

    data[tIdx] = In;
    __syncthreads();

    for(unsigned int i = blockDim.x/2; i > 0; i >>= 1){

        if(tIdx < i){

            data[tIdx] += data[tIdx + i];   
        }

        __syncthreads();
    }

    return data[0];

}

Kernel:

__global__ 
void AvgDistance(float *X, float *Y, float *Avg, const int N){

    int tIdx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    int bIdx = blockIdx.x;

    float x , y;
    float d = 0.0f;
    if(tIdx < N){

        for(int i = tIdx + 1; i < N ; i++){

            x = X[tIdx] - X[i];
            y = Y[tIdx] - Y[i];

            d += 1.0e0f/(sqrtf(x*x + y*y));     
        }
        __syncthreads();
        Avg[bIdx] = ReduceSum2(d);

    }
}

The kernel is configured and launched as follows:

dim3 threads(BlockSize,BlockSize);
dim3 blocks(ceil(Np/threads.x),ceil(Np/threads.y));

InitRNG<<<blocks.x,threads.x>>>(d_state,seed);
SortPoints<<<blocks.x,threads.x>>>(d_rx,d_ry,Np,d_state);
AvgDistance<<<blocks.x,threads.x,threads.x*sizeof(float)>>>(d_rx,d_ry,d_Avg,Np);

Finally, I copy the data back to host and then perform the remaining sum:

Avg = new float[blocks.x];

CHECK(cudaMemcpy(Avg,d_Avg,blocks.x*sizeof(float),cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost),ERROR_CPY_DEVTOH);
float average = 0;

for(int i = 0; i < blocks.x; i++){
    average += Avg[i];
}
average = average/(float)Np;

For 4k points, ok! the results are:

Average distance between points (via Kernel) = 108.615
Average distance between points (via CPU) = 110.191

In this case the sum may be performed in different order, causing both results to diverge from each other, I don't know...

But when it comes to 8k, the results are quiet different:

Average distance between points (via Kernel) = 153.63
Average distance between points (via CPU) = 131.471

To me it seems that both the kernel and the serial code are written the same way. What leads me to distrust the precision on CUDA calculation of floating point numbers. Does this make sense? Or are the access to global memory causing some conflicts when some threads load the same data from X and Y at the same time? Or the way I wrote the kernel is in some way 'wrong'(I mean, am I doing something that is causing both results to diverge from each other?).

share|improve this question
2  
The sqrtf() function in CUDA is approximate, suitable for graphics but not numerical analysis. Check the CUDA documentation for alternatives. –  Pieter Geerkens Mar 12 '13 at 20:15
1  
I would suggest reading this NVIDIA whitepaper: developer.nvidia.com/sites/default/files/akamai/cuda/files/… –  njuffa Mar 12 '13 at 21:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Actually, from what I can tell, the problem seems to be on the CPU side. I created a sample code based on your code.

I was able to reproduce your results.

First I switched all instances of sinf, cosf, and sqrtf to their corresponding double versions. This made no difference in the results.

Next I included a typedef so I could easily switch the precision from float to double and back, replacing every relevant instance of float in the code with mytype which is my typedef.

When I run the code with typedef of float and a data size of 4096 I get these results:

GPU average = 108.294922
CPU average = 109.925285

When I run the code with typedef of double and a data size of 4096 I get these results:

GPU average = 108.294903
CPU average = 108.294903

When I run the code with typedef of float and a data size of 8192 I get these results:

GPU average = 153.447327
CPU average = 131.473526

When I run the code with typedef of double and a data size of 8192 I get these results:

GPU average = 153.447380
CPU average = 153.447380

There are at least 2 observations:

  1. The GPU results don't vary between float and double, except in the 5th decimal place
  2. The CPU results vary by 1-20% or so between float and double, but when double is selected, they line up exactly (to the 6th decimal place, anyway) with the GPU results.

Based on this, I believe the CPU is providing the variable, questionable behavior.

Here's my code for reference:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <curand.h>
#include <curand_kernel.h>
#define DSIZE 8192
#define BlockSize 32
#define pi 3.14159f


#define cudaCheckErrors(msg) \
    do { \
        cudaError_t __err = cudaGetLastError(); \
        if (__err != cudaSuccess) { \
            fprintf(stderr, "Fatal error: %s (%s at %s:%d)\n", \
                msg, cudaGetErrorString(__err), \
                __FILE__, __LINE__); \
            fprintf(stderr, "*** FAILED - ABORTING\n"); \
            exit(1); \
        } \
    } while (0)

typedef double mytype;

__global__ void InitRNG ( curandState * state, const int seed ){
    int tIdx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    curand_init (seed, tIdx, 0, &state[tIdx]);
}

__global__
void SortPoints(mytype* X, mytype* Y,const int N, curandState *state){

    mytype rdmn1, rdmn2;

    unsigned int tIdx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    mytype range;
    if(tIdx < N){
        rdmn1 = curand_uniform(&state[tIdx]);
        rdmn2 = curand_uniform(&state[tIdx]);
        range = sqrt(0.25e0f*N*rdmn1);
            X[tIdx] = range*cos(2.0e0f*pi*rdmn2);
            Y[tIdx] = range*sin(2.0e0f*pi*rdmn2);
    }
}

__device__
mytype ReduceSum2(mytype In){

    __shared__ mytype data[BlockSize];

    unsigned int tIdx = threadIdx.x;

    data[tIdx] = In;
    __syncthreads();

    for(unsigned int i = blockDim.x/2; i > 0; i >>= 1){

        if(tIdx < i){

            data[tIdx] += data[tIdx + i];
        }

        __syncthreads();
    }

    return data[0];

}

__global__
void AvgDistance(mytype *X, mytype *Y, mytype *Avg, const int N){

    int tIdx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    int bIdx = blockIdx.x;

    mytype x , y;
    mytype d = 0.0f;
    if(tIdx < N){

        for(int i = tIdx + 1; i < N ; i++){

            x = X[tIdx] - X[i];
            y = Y[tIdx] - Y[i];

            d += 1.0e0f/(sqrt(x*x + y*y));
        }
        __syncthreads();
        Avg[bIdx] = ReduceSum2(d);

    }
}

mytype cpu_avg(const mytype *rx, const mytype *ry, const int size){
  mytype average = 0.0f;
  for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
    for(int j = i + 1; j < size; j++){
        average += 1.0e0f/sqrt((rx[i]-rx[j])*(rx[i]-rx[j]) + (ry[i]-ry[j])*(ry[i]-ry[j]));
    }
  }
  average = average/(mytype)size;
  return average;
}

int main() {

  int Np = DSIZE;
  mytype *rx, *ry, *d_rx, *d_ry, *d_Avg, *Avg;
  curandState *d_state;
  int seed = 1;

  dim3 threads(BlockSize,BlockSize);
  dim3 blocks((int)ceilf(Np/(float)threads.x),(int)ceilf(Np/(float)threads.y));
  printf("number of blocks = %d\n", blocks.x);
  printf("number of threads= %d\n", threads.x);
  rx = (mytype *)malloc(DSIZE*sizeof(mytype));
  if (rx == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  ry = (mytype *)malloc(DSIZE*sizeof(mytype));
  if (ry == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}

  cudaMalloc((void**)&d_rx, DSIZE * sizeof(mytype));
  cudaMalloc((void**)&d_ry, DSIZE * sizeof(mytype));
  cudaMalloc((void**)&d_Avg, blocks.x * sizeof(mytype));
  cudaMalloc((void**)&d_state, DSIZE * sizeof(curandState));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamalloc");



  InitRNG<<<blocks.x,threads.x>>>(d_state,seed);
  SortPoints<<<blocks.x,threads.x>>>(d_rx,d_ry,Np,d_state);
  AvgDistance<<<blocks.x,threads.x,threads.x*sizeof(mytype)>>>(d_rx,d_ry,d_Avg,Np);
  cudaCheckErrors("kernels");


  Avg = new mytype[blocks.x];

  cudaMemcpy(Avg,d_Avg,blocks.x*sizeof(mytype),cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaMemcpy(rx, d_rx, DSIZE*sizeof(mytype),cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaMemcpy(ry, d_ry, DSIZE*sizeof(mytype),cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudamemcpy");
  mytype average = 0;

  for(int i = 0; i < blocks.x; i++){
    average += Avg[i];
  }
  average = average/(mytype)Np;

  printf("GPU average = %f\n", average);
  average = cpu_avg(rx, ry, DSIZE);
  printf("CPU average = %f\n", average);

  return 0;
}

I am running on RHEL 5.5, CUDA 5.0, Intel Xeon X5560

compiled with:

nvcc -O3 -arch=sm_20 -lcurand -lm -o t93 t93.cu

EDIT: After observing that the variability was on the CPU side, I found that I could eliminate most of the CPU variability by modifying your CPU averaging code like this:

mytype cpu_avg(const mytype *rx, const mytype *ry, const int size){
  mytype average = 0.0f;
  mytype temp = 0.0f;
  for(int i = 0; i < size; i++){
    for(int j = i + 1; j < size; j++){
        temp += 1.0e0f/sqrt((rx[i]-rx[j])*(rx[i]-rx[j]) + (ry[i]-ry[j])*(ry[i]-ry[j]));
    }
    average += temp/(mytype)size;
    temp = 0.0f;
  }
  return average;
}

So I would say there's a problem with intermediate results on the CPU side. It's interesting that it doesn't show up on the GPU result. I suspect the reason for this is that the final summation of GPU averages is done on the CPU (therefore each individual GPU block result is scaled down by the size, e.g. 8192), and these may have an intermediate precision that is sufficient to survive until the final division. If you inlined the CPU average calculation, you may observe something different again.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I really appreciated that! –  Bessa Mar 13 '13 at 5:16
    
+1 for the effort, great having people like you helping around –  Glove Nov 19 '13 at 23:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.