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I'm learning myself Scala and one of the small test application I wrote just isn't working the way I expect it to. Can someone please help me understand why my test application is failing.

My small test application consists of a "decompress" method that does the following "decompression"

  val testList = List(Tuple2(4, 'a'), Tuple2(1, 'b'), Tuple2(2, 'c'), Tuple2(2, 'a'), Tuple2(1, 'd'), Tuple2(4, 'e'))
  require(decompress(testList) == List('a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'a', 'a', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e'))

In other words the Tuple2 objects should just be "decompressed" into a more verbose form. Yet all that I get back from the method is List('a', 'a', 'a', 'a') - the padTo statement works for the first Tuple2 but then it just suddenly stops working? If I however do the padding per element using a for loop - everything works...?

The full code:

object P12 extends App {

  def decompress(tList: List[Tuple2[Int,Any]]): List[Any] = {
    val startingList: List[Any] = List();
    val newList = tList.foldLeft(startingList)((b,a) => {
      val padCount = a._1;
      val padElement = a._2;

      println
      println("  Current list: " + b)
      println("  Current padCount: " + padCount)
      println("  Current padElement: " + padElement)
      println("  Padded using padTo: " + b.padTo(padCount, padElement))
      println

      // This doesn't work
      b.padTo(padCount, padElement)

//      // This works, yay
//      var tmpNewList = b;
//      for (i <- 1 to padCount)
//        tmpNewList = tmpNewList :+ padElement
//      tmpNewList
    })
    newList
  }

  val testList = List(Tuple2(4, 'a'), Tuple2(1, 'b'), Tuple2(2, 'c'), Tuple2(2, 'a'), Tuple2(1, 'd'), Tuple2(4, 'e'))
  require(decompress(testList) == List('a', 'a', 'a', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'c', 'a', 'a', 'd', 'e', 'e', 'e', 'e'))
  println("Everything is okay!")
}

Any help appreciated - learning Scala, just can't figure out this problem on my own with my current Scala knowledge.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that padTo actually fills the list up to a given size. So the first time it works with 4 elements padded, but the next time you'll have to add the actual length of the curent list - hence:

def decompress(tList: List[Tuple2[Int,Any]]): List[Any] = {
  val newList = tList.foldLeft(List[Any]())((b,a) => {
   b.padTo(a._1+b.length, a._2)
 }) 
 newList
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, appreciated :) – NS du Toit Mar 13 '13 at 6:39

You could do your decompress like this:

val list = List(Tuple2(4, 'a'), Tuple2(1, 'b'), Tuple2(2, 'c'), Tuple2(2, 'a'), Tuple2(1, 'd'), Tuple2(4, 'e'))
list.flatMap{case (times, value) => Seq.fill(times)(value)}
share|improve this answer
    
Similary, def decompress(tSeq: Seq[Tuple2[Int,Any]]): Seq[Any] = tSeq.flatMap { e => Seq.fill(e._1)(e._2) } Ie using a different flatMap syntax, but I also refactored the solution to use a Seq as I see its higher up the collection class hierarchy - and I guess will support both immutable and mutable collection types (List being an immutable collection type implementation). – NS du Toit Mar 13 '13 at 7:15

This works:

scala> testList.foldLeft(List[Char]()){ case (xs, (count, elem)) => xs ++ List(elem).padTo(count, elem)}
res7: List[Char] = List(a, a, a, a, b, c, c, a, a, d, e, e, e, e)

The problem actually is that when you say b.padTo(padCount, padElement) you use always the same list (b) to fill up the elements. Because the first tuple data generate the most elements nothing is added in the next step of foldLeft. If you change the second tuple data you will see a change:

scala> val testList = List(Tuple2(3, 'a'), Tuple2(4, 'b'))
testList: List[(Int, Char)] = List((3,a), (4,b))

scala> testList.foldLeft(List[Char]()){ case (xs, (count, elem)) => xs.padTo(count, elem)}
res11: List[Char] = List(a, a, a, b)

Instead of foldLeft you can also use flatMap to generate the elements:

scala> testList flatMap { case (count, elem) => List(elem).padTo(count, elem) }
res8: List[Char] = List(a, a, a, a, b, c, c, a, a, d, e, e, e, e)

By the way, Tuple(3, 'a') can be written (3, 'a') or 3 -> 'a'

Note that padTo doesn't work as expected when you have data with a count of <= 0:

scala> List(0 -> 'a') flatMap { case (count, elem) => List(elem).padTo(count, elem) }
res31: List[Char] = List(a)

Thus use the solution mentioned by Garret Hall:

def decompress[A](xs: Seq[(Int, A)]) =
  xs flatMap { case (count, elem) => Seq.fill(count)(elem) }

scala> decompress(List(2 -> 'a', 3 -> 'b', 2 -> 'c', 0 -> 'd'))
res34: Seq[Char] = List(a, a, b, b, b, c, c)

scala> decompress(List(2 -> 0, 3 -> 1, 2 -> 2))
res35: Seq[Int] = List(0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2)

Using a generic type signature should be referred in order to return always correct type.

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