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I'm writing a generic adder with carry/overflow check and I make heavy use of c++11 type check features.

this is my code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#define MIN_OF(TYPE) ( (std::is_signed<decltype(res)>::value) ? \
                                (1 << ( ( sizeof(decltype(res)) * 8 ) - 1)) : \
                                0 )

#define MAX_OF(TYPE) (~MIN_OF(TYPE))


#define ABS(x)  (x < 0 ? -x : x)

class Flags
{
public:
    void setSign(bool x)
    {
        cout << boolalpha;
        cout << "setSign: " << x << endl;
    }
    void setOverflow(bool x)
    {
        cout << boolalpha;
        cout << "setOverflow: " << x << endl;
    }
    void setCarry(bool x)
    {
        cout << boolalpha;
        cout << "setCarry: " << x << endl;
    }
    void setZero(bool x)
    {
        cout << boolalpha;
        cout << "setZero: " << x << endl;
    }
};

template <typename TYPE, TYPE def>
class Value
{
public:
static inline TYPE get()
{
    return def;
}
static inline void set(TYPE x)
{
    cout << "value: " << hex << x << endl;
}
};


template <class A, class B, class RES>
struct ADD
{
static void Do(Flags* _flags)
{
    if (std::is_convertible<decltype(A::get()),decltype(RES::get())>::value)
    {
        decltype(A::get()) _a = A::get();
        decltype(B::get()) _b = B::get();

        decltype(RES::get()) res = _a;

        if (_b != 0)
        {
            res = res + _b;

            if (std::is_signed<decltype(res)>::value)
            {
                unsigned char highestbit_a = static_cast<unsigned char>(0x1 & (_a >> (( sizeof(decltype(_a)) * 8 ) - 1)));
                unsigned char highestbit_b = static_cast<unsigned char>(0x1 & (_b >> (( sizeof(decltype(_b)) * 8 ) - 1)));
                unsigned char highestbit_res = static_cast<unsigned char>(0x1 & (res >> (( sizeof(decltype(res)) * 8 ) - 1)));

                _flags->setSign( (res < 0) );
                _flags->setOverflow( ((highestbit_a & highestbit_b) != highestbit_res) );
            }
            else
            {
                _flags->setSign( false );
                _flags->setOverflow( false );
            }

            bool setCarryFlag = false;

            if (std::is_signed<decltype(_b)>::value)
            {
                if(_b < 0)
                {
                    /* as _b is negative, we add _b to lowest_res, if the result
                     *  is greater as _a, _a + _b (with _b as negative number) would
                     * result in an carry out
                     */
                    setCarryFlag = (static_cast<decltype(_a)>(ABS((MIN_OF(decltype(res)) - _b))) > _a);
                }
                else
                {
                    setCarryFlag = (static_cast<decltype(_a)>((MAX_OF(decltype(res)) - _b)) < _a);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                //get difference of one summand to results highest until carry
                /* MARKED LINE: this branch gets wrongly checked */
                setCarryFlag = ((MAX_OF(decltype(res)) - _b) < _a);
            }

            _flags->setCarry( setCarryFlag );
        }
        else
        {
            if (std::is_signed<decltype(res)>::value)
            {
                _flags->setSign( (res < 0) );
            }
        }

        _flags->setZero( (res == 0) );

        //store result
        RES::set(res);
    }
}
};



int main()
{
Flags* f = new Flags();
ADD<Value<unsigned int, 1>, Value<signed int, 6>, Value<unsigned int, 1>>::Do(f);

return 0;
}

The problem occurs at the "MARKED LINE: ". Normally, I would understand that the compiler wont use this branch, as _b is type of signed int and so is_signed should be true, so the compiler should only use whats in the if-branch and throw away the else branch. But it doesnt seem to do this, as I get the warning:

 warning: comparison between signed and unsigned integer expressions [-Wsign-compare]|

Pointed to this line. But this is not what i want. Any Ideas how to tell the compiler to do the right thing?

comiler is: gcc 4.7.2 on x86-64, debian

Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
Which is the "MARKED LINE"? –  Andy Prowl Mar 12 '13 at 21:16
    
There is a comment in code, containing this buzzword:{ //get difference of one summand to results highest until carry /* MARKED LINE: this branch gets wrongly checked */ if (!std::is_signed<decltype(_b)>::value) setCarryFlag = ((MAX_OF(decltype(res)) - _b) < _a); } –  user1159208 Mar 12 '13 at 21:17
    
Well, the compiler does these checks before optimizing I believe. –  Jesse Good Mar 12 '13 at 21:18
    
The warning happens because the code is still compiled, even though an optimizer can tell it's dead code. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 12 '13 at 21:20
2  
"I make heavy use of c++11 type check features" combined with macros ... I am disappoint. Then macros don't even refer to their arguments. The macros should not even exist. Why. I don't even. –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 12 '13 at 23:17
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2 Answers

It is a warning, not an error. Warnings are there to warn you about things that you likely do not want to do, but are llegal. In this case you want to do it, so ignore it. You could use a pragma to ignore the warning, however I would recomend documenting how you know it is safe for future devs.

The GCC specific pragmas to disable this warning are:

#pragma GCC diagnostic push
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wsign-compare"
setCarryFlag = ((MAX_OF(decltype(res)) - _b) < _a);
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop
share|improve this answer
    
I'm working with -Werr and this shall not be changed, so Warning == Error. –  user1159208 Mar 12 '13 at 21:23
    
@user1159208, "Doctor, doctor, it hurts when I do this" "Then don't do that" –  Jonathan Wakely Mar 12 '13 at 23:14
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The problem here is the compiler is compiling all the code, even that which will become dead code, because it doesn't know any better.

The classic solution is, I believe, to provide another template parameter which has a default value of std::is_signed<B::get()>::value, and then specialize on that parameter*. But since you're testing signed-ness for two of your parameters, that's going to get complicated.

Another option may simply be to create a signed variable inside the if condition and use that. That will simply bypass the warning.

if (std::is_signed<decltype(res)>::value) {
    typename std::make_signed<decltype(res)>::type sres = res;
    // now use sres
}

*Xeo reminds me that you can't partially specialize function templates, so the classic solution is actually tag dispatching.

share|improve this answer
1  
The classic solution is, actually, to do tag dispatching. You can't aprtially specialize a function template. Also, the "solution" is non-sense. If res is already signed, why create another signed version of it? –  Xeo Mar 12 '13 at 21:30
    
@Xeo: We're creating a signed version of it so the compiler doesn't complain when res is actually unsigned, which is the fundamental problem here. res is unsigned, so the if condition is 0, but the compiler still has to compile the body of the if, which is where the warning comes from. By making a signed version, we're basically telling the compiler to compile this code as if it were signed. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 12 '13 at 21:32
    
Tag dispatching means calling a new function f that is overloaded on std::true_type and std::false_type (for example), and calling f(other, args, std::is_signed<T>());. The compiler will only ever see the corresponding overload and not complain about the other. With that, the signedness problem is solved too. –  Xeo Mar 12 '13 at 21:33
    
@Xeo: If there were only one variable at play here, tag dispatching would be fine. But he's actually testing for signedness of both B and RES, so are you proposing he writes the same function 4 times? Then what happens if he needs to test for signedness of A as well? Now it's 8 versions of the function. That's why the make_signed<> trick is attractive. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 12 '13 at 21:35
    
Xeo: i didnt really get the point of tag dispatching. can you please explain this further or give some reference links? thx. –  user1159208 Mar 12 '13 at 21:49
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