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I have a big dataset where I use to run linear regression models with some qualitative predictor variables. I call the dataset WN and the qualitative variables are OState and DState (States in US). Here you will see that there are 62 unique values of OState and DState within WN:

> unique(WN$OState)
[1] NY MA PA DE DC VA MD WV NC RI SC NH GA FL AL TN MS ME KY OH IN MI VT IA WI MN SD ND MT CT IL MO KS NE NJ LA AR OK TX CO WY ID UT AZ NM NV CA OR WA
62 Levels: AA AE AK AL AP AR AS AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL FM GA GU HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MH MI MN MO MP MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA PR PW RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VI VT WA ... WY
> unique(WN$DState)
[1] MA RI NH ME VT CT NY NJ PA DE DC VA MD WV NC SC GA FL AL TN MS KY OH IN MI IA WI MN SD ND MT IL MO KS NE LA AR OK TX CO WY ID UT AZ NM NV CA OR WA
62 Levels: AA AE AK AL AP AR AS AZ CA CO CT DC DE FL FM GA GU HI IA ID IL IN KS KY LA MA MD ME MH MI MN MO MP MS MT NC ND NE NH NJ NM NV NY OH OK OR PA PR PW RI SC SD TN TX UT VA VI VT WA ... WY

Now I am running the regression model to predict Rate with Distance, OState and DState as follows:

> WN.LR = lm(WN$Rate~WN$Distance+WN$OState+WN$DState) 

When I check the regression summary, I see that only 48 OState and DState predictors are populated, and remaining 14 are missing. A small part of the summary output is given below. For example you will see that OStateAL is missing in the output:

> summary(WN.LR)

Call:
lm(formula = WN$Rate ~ WN$Distance + WN$OState + WN$DState)

Residuals:
    Min      1Q  Median      3Q     Max 
-2370.3  -218.4   -18.9   170.8  9105.7 

Coefficients:
              Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
(Intercept)  1.208e+03  6.632e+00 182.171  < 2e-16 ***
WN$Distance  1.626e+00  3.111e-03 522.722  < 2e-16 ***
WN$OStateAR  2.000e+02  7.294e+00  27.419  < 2e-16 ***
WN$OStateAZ  1.981e+02  8.372e+00  23.667  < 2e-16 ***
WN$OStateCA  1.056e+02  7.919e+00  13.340  < 2e-16 ***
WN$OStateCO  1.323e+02  7.332e+00  18.043  < 2e-16 ***
WN$OStateCT -2.019e+02  1.827e+01 -11.048  < 2e-16 ***
WN$OStateDC  5.711e+02  2.178e+01  26.223  < 2e-16 ***

On the other hand, when I check the entities with OState = "AL", I see that there are over 6000 rows:

> WNnew<-subset(WN,OState=="AL")
> nrow(WNnew)
[1] 6213

Any explanation for this?

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2 Answers 2

This is likely to be because of aliasing (i.e. your model is overidentified). For example, Massachusetts is a level in both your DState and OState variables, so I think its effect in both treatments can't be separated.

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You didn't read the warnings , i.e. all the NA's in the coefficient list, when your model was constructed. The aliased terms will be listed when you run:

WN.LR  # always look at the output of `lm` as well as that of `summary.lm`

... and you just failed to read the output. What you might consider is creating a "same" level in say OState where the DState is the same as the OState and thenallow that to capture all the states where there is no difference.

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