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So I'm working on a method that gets the number of nodes in a binary search tree, when I have 3 nodes, it gives me 3, but if I do 5 it gives me 4, what do I need to change?

int BinaryTree::size(int count, Node *leaf) const
{
    if(leaf != NULL)//if we are not at a leaf
    {
        size(count + 1, leaf->getLeft());//recurisvly call the function and increment the count
        size(count + 1, leaf->getRight());
    }
    else
    {
        return count;//return the count
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Asking people to spot errors in your code is not especially productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, by tracing the progress of your program, and comparing it to what you expect to happen. As soon as the two diverge, then you've found your problem. (And then if necessary, you should construct a minimal test-case.) – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 12 '13 at 21:57
    
You are missing a return statement in the true branch of your if – Andy Prowl Mar 12 '13 at 21:57
    
You don't have a return value in the first block of the if statement. What value do you mean to return? – Lorkenpeist Mar 12 '13 at 21:59
int BinaryTree::size(Node *leaf) const 
{
    if(leaf == NULL) { //This node doesn't exist. Therefore there are no nodes in this 'subtree'
        return 0;
    } else { //Add the size of the left and right trees, then add 1 (which is the current node)
        return size(leaf->getLeft()) + size(leaf->getRight()) + 1;
    }
}

While this is a different approach, I find that is it easier to read through than what you had.

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int BinaryTree::size(Node *n) const
{
    if(!n) 
        return 0;
    else
        return size(n->getLeft()) + 1 + size(n->getRight()); 
}
share|improve this answer

Other people have already chimed in with a correct algorithm. I'm just going to explain why your algorithm doesn't work.

The logic behind your algorithm seems to be: keep a running count value. If the leaf is null then it has no children so return the count, if the leaf is not null then recurse down the children.

This is backwards though. Because you're going to need to pass your int by reference, not value, and then not increment if it's null, increment if it's not null, and recurse.

So your original idea would work with some modifications, but Nick Mitchinson and arrows have a better way. This is your algorithm fixed so it works:

int BinaryTree::size(Node *leaf, int& count=0) const
{
    if(leaf != NULL)//if we are not at a leaf
    {
        count++;
        size(leaf->getLeft(), count);//recurisvly call the function and increment the count
        size(leaf->getRight(), count);
    }

    return count;//return the count
}

But again, there are better ways to write this. And the other answers show them.

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thanks that helps me understand it. – compprog254 Mar 12 '13 at 23:32

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