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I've had a good look around the previous posts and I don't think that this topic has been covered, hopefully somebody can help. I'm writing a code in fortran 2003, and using ifort. I have the following types which I need to manipulate, which I have design to give the flexibility that I need:

module parameters    

double precision, target :: cur_x(3)    

    type fundamental
            double precision, pointer   ::  x => null()
    end type fundamental

    type, extends(fundamental) :: ion
            class(fundamental), pointer ::  core => null()
     end type ion

SAVE
end module parameters

The idea being that I build up a kind of a linked list of particles by using the previous in the list as the core of the next. Note that in reality I will have a large number of extensions to 'fundamental', all of which can be the 'core' of other particles. I want the calculated quantities, x, to be in an array together in physical memory as I will be addressing subsets of them in fairly complicated ways, for which I want to use another set of pointers to cur_x

The initialisation of the code goes like this, where I have added some diagnostic lines:

use parameters

    type(fundamental), target :: electron, proton
            type(ion), target :: hydrogen

    write(*,*)associated(electron%x),associated(proton%x), &
                   & associated(hydrogen%core),associated(hydrogen%core%x)

        electron%x => cur_x(1)

        hydrogen%core => proton
        proton%x => cur_x(2)
        hydrogen%x => cur_x(3)

        cur_x = 1.0

    write(*,*)electron%x,proton%x,hydrogen%x,hydrogen%core%x

which prints

F F F T
1.0 1.0 1.0 <garbage>

Where I expect proton%x and hydrogen%core%x to be the same address in memory (cur_x(2)). So I have two questions

  1. I have initialised all my pointers to be null. Why does associated(hydrogen%core%x) give true? If I try and nullify this pointer at the top of the code I get inconsistent results; using

    nullify(hydrogen%core%x)
    

    results in a segmentation fault. Performing

    hydrogen%core%x => null()
    

    allows the code to run, but associated(hydrogen%core%x) remains true

  2. I have made sure to associate the list of pointers from parent to child, as suggested in this summary of surprising errors in fortran. The fact that proton%x is working but hydrogen%core%x gives garbage is something I don't understand.

I can work around the problem but this would sacrifice the generality that I will need for more complex calculations. I would also quite like to understand what is going wrong here.

Thanks for your help! Jim

EDIT: added in 'target' properties for various things; note that this were always in the code, i just forgot them in transferring to this post

EDIT: To clarify, my main issue with the above code is that the final write command gives an uninitialised output for hydrogen%core%x, even following the association commands after the first write. Even though I initialise core as null in my type definitions, there seems to be a problem with it; and if I try and nullify it at the top of the code the program crashes.

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2 Answers 2

  1. If hydrogen%core is not associated, then it is a programming error to reference (or define) hydrogen%core%x as you do so in the first write statement. With that programming error present, anything goes from that point on.

  2. You don't say what version of ifort you are using but there have been (and I think are extant, if I recall recent posts on the Intel forums) compiler bugs to do with polymorphic pointers.

That aside, for hydrogen%core to be pointed at the local proton variable, then proton must have the TARGET attribute. I would expect the compiler to diagnose this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. You're right, proton does have the target attribute in my code - i just forgot it in this post. I should note that the reason the write statement is there is that I was getting nonsense in the later parts of the code. I was given the impression that the problems arise because I have not initialised or nullified the various pointers before I start; since I seem to be unable to do that for the case of hydrogen%core, Im stuck –  user2162855 Mar 13 '13 at 2:19
    
I don't think the content of that link is relevant here. As explained by Balint and myself, you cannot nullify hydrogen$core%x before hydrogen%core is validly associated. Are you running the latest release of ifort (13.1.0)? If not, there are compiler bugs that will cause problems. –  IanH Mar 13 '13 at 2:37
    
No, i am using 12.1.5. I have a work around going that has convinced me that it is the compiler ( hydrogen%core%x => <anything> has no effect regardless of initialisation ); since it is unlikely that the compiler will get patched anytime soon I will stick with the workaround. Thanks for your help! –  user2162855 Mar 13 '13 at 16:32

The basic problem is that hydrogen%core is not associated. The effect of associated(hydrogen%core%x) is therefore indeterministic. You just can not access/query a field (x) of a derived type pointer (hydrogen%core), if the pointer is not associated e.g. points to null() instead of an existing derived type instance in memory. Your compiler may generate a code, which does not immediately crash when you try it, but whatever is done after that is indeterministic, as you probably have already overwritten some data at random memory address.

Actually, I compiled a self-containing version of your code (see below) with various compilers and I got immediate segfaults at the first write statement. Using appropriate check options one of the binaries even reports the reason being in referencing the disassociated pointer hydrogen%core. If you comment out the problematic associated() query (as in the code below) all binaries run fine.

Also, please note, that the variables electron and proton must have the target attribute, otherwise the code should not even compile at all. If your compiler compiles the code without complaints, you should probably think about changing to an other one.

  module parameters    
  implicit none
  save

  type :: fundamental
    double precision, pointer ::  x => null()
  end type fundamental

  type, extends(fundamental) :: ion
    class(fundamental), pointer ::  core => null()
  end type ion

end module parameters

program test
  use parameters
  implicit none

  type(fundamental), target :: electron, proton
  type(ion) :: hydrogen
  double precision, target :: cur_x(3)

  ! If you remove the comment in the next statement, the program will be indeterministic
  ! and probably crash.
  write(*,*) associated(electron%x),associated(proton%x), &
      & associated(hydrogen%core)!, associated(hydrogen%core%x)

  electron%x => cur_x(1)
  hydrogen%core => proton
  proton%x => cur_x(2)
  hydrogen%x => cur_x(3)
  cur_x(:) = 1.0
  write(*,*)electron%x,proton%x,hydrogen%x,hydrogen%core%x

end program test
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Hi there, thank you for your reply. The code does in fact have the target attributes are required - i just forgot them in the post. My issue is not really with the first write statement, rather the nonsence output from the second. I believe that in the commands following the first write, I associate the various pointers in the correct order, however I still get uninitialised output from hydrogen%core%x. According to the link that I reference, this may be because I have not nullified the pointers at the beginning, however in the case of hydrogen%core%x I can't seem to do this. –  user2162855 Mar 13 '13 at 2:24
    
Run the code above with your compiler (leave the comment sign in the write statment). With a standard compliant compiler, you should get reasonable output from your 2nd write statement, as I get. If you, however, uncomment the associated() call from the first line, whatever happens after is indeterministic (if you're lucky, your program crashes immediately) so you can't draw any conclusions from it! –  Bálint Aradi Mar 13 '13 at 7:05

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