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I have long ago been willing to get the line between native Arrays and regular Objects totally blurred, not only extending Object with the same capabilities as Arrays got in ES5, but bundle up with my custom package of methods on both sides.

Couple of smart people thought about these paradigm changes. Like Angus Croll mentioned it in the article javascript-object-keys-finally:

"Moreover as the line between Arrays and regular Objects blurs (aided by custom getters and setters) we’re likely to see a growth in generic “array-like” objects which enjoy the best of both worlds – non-numeric identifiers and access to the rich API set defined by Array.prototype. EcmaScript 5 has apparently pre-empted this trend by introducing the generic method, defined by one type but useable by any."

Along the way, he get things coded in the article: extending-objects-with-javascript-getters

function extendAsArray(obj) {
    if (obj.length === undefined || obj.__lookupGetter__('length')) {
        var index = 0;
        for (var prop in obj) {
            if(!obj.__lookupGetter__(prop)) {
                (function(thisIndex, thisProp) {
                    obj.__defineGetter__(thisIndex, function() {return obj[thisProp]});
                })(index, prop)
                index++;
            }
        };
        obj.__defineGetter__("length", function() {return index});
    }
    return obj;
}

var myObj = {
    left:50,
    top:20,
    width:10,
    height:10
}

extendAsArray(myObj);

[].map.call(myObj,function(s){return s+' px'}).join(', '); 
//"50px ,20px ,10px, 10px"

This approach is exceptionally interesting for me. However, it is also seemingly suffering a couple of serious problems!

  1. How about extending the original myObj model with a couple of new properties? Should we run extendAsArray on every property change to update it's concerning length property?

  2. When a property changes, it's not just the length property that's relevant; the array indices should also be updated, because an array-like property request definitely turns out to be undefined. So when

    console.log(myObj.length) -> 4
    myObj.zAxis=0
    

    then

    console.log(myObj[4]) // -> undefined!
    console.log(myObj.length) // -> 4!
    

I have modified Angus' code accordingly, so it supports automatic update of length property on request:

function extendAsArray(obj) {
    var index = 0;
    for(var prop in obj){
        if(!obj.__lookupGetter__(prop)){
           (function(thisIndex, thisProp){
              Object.defineProperty(obj, thisIndex, {
                    get: function(){return obj[thisProp]}
                    , enumerable: true
                    , configurable: true
                    , writeable: true
              });
           })(index, prop)
           index++;
        }
    }
    if(!obj.__lookupGetter__('length')){
       Object.defineProperty(obj, 'length', {
          get: function(){
            return extendAsArray(obj);
          }
          , configurable: true
          , writeable: true
       });
       return obj;
    }
    else{
       return index;
    }
}

The problem is: how do we updating the object's array indices together with its length property when a property is changed, added or removed?

Should I use Object.watch?

And there is still an unsolved question: how to interfere with my own unshimmed utility library, having made it also for Objects in a consistent way?

I am using the same codebase for both types: z.Object({}).mapEvery does the same as z.Object([]).mapEvery

Please avoid mentioning JQuery, and Underscore as well. I have got a comprehensive, custom list of methods for both types, and I am willing to use the standards completed possibly with my unshimmed ones, and I am not willing to refactor it!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is a library watch.js out there, which is watching out for either property updates or new property addition as well. try out!

It is working with setInterval, so it is not performance-friendly however.

When Harmony is out, we can do things that simply:

Object.observe(obj,Observer);

Check the spec for that: Harmony

But, when later object extension is not in focus, i can freeze up the whole object upon initialization, not to be bothered with neither property changes nor property addition.

The code is changed accordingly:

extendAsArray = function z_extendAsArray(obj){
    var index = 0;
    for(var prop in obj){
        if(!obj.__lookupGetter__(prop)){
           (function(thisIndex, thisProp){
              Object.defineProperty(obj, thisIndex, {
                    get: function(){return obj[thisProp]}
                    , enumerable: true
                    , configurable: true
                    , writeable: true
              });
           })(index, prop)
           index++;
        }
    }
    if(!obj.__lookupGetter__('length')){
       Object.defineProperty(obj, 'length', {
        value:index
       });
       if(!Object.freeze){
          Object.defineProperty(Object, "freeze", {
                enumerable: false
              , configurable: false
              , writable: false
              , value: function (obj) {
                  var props = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(obj);
                  for(var i=0; i<props.length; i++){
                      var desc = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(obj,props[i]);
                      if("value" in desc ){
                         desc.writable = false;
                      }
                      desc.configurable = false;
                      Object.defineProperty( obj, props[i], desc );
                  }
                  return Object.preventExtensions(obj);
              }
          });
       }
       Object.freeze(obj);
    }
    return obj;
};

Also i have found out what Angus Croll, who has been mentioned by the previous post has talked about it.

"Yes, we can make use of the equivalent functionality offered by well written libraries like underscore.js, but still we’re locked into non-standard, inverted signatures in which methods are static and objects are merely extra arguments – an ungainly arrangement for an instance-only language. At some point all supported browsers will be ES5 compliant, at which point the shimmed codebase can simply remove it’s shim library and carry on, while the unshimmed one must choose between a major refactor or a perpetually non-standard and static utility library."

share|improve this answer

I guess this is your question:

how do we updating the object's array indices together with its length property when a property is changed, added or removed?

You create methods to do it, so you essentially mimic the Object internal methods. I don't think you can do that with getters and setters, but I may be wrong about that.

The rest is more of a comment than an answer.

I have long ago been willing to get the line between native Arrays and regular Objects totally blurred

The line is already totally blurred. Arrays are Objects, the only thing that sets them apart is their special length property.

EcmaScript 5 has apparently pre-empted this trend by introducing the generic method,

ES5 didn't introduce generic methods, they have been in the language since ed 3 at least.

defined by one type but useable by any

Not at all, in fact ES5 is more restrictive. In ed 3, call and apply coerce the thisArg to an object using Object(*thisArg*), or substitute the global object if nothing was passed. Not so in ES5 which passes thisArg unmodified.

The restriction on using arrays as objects is related to convention, not the language itself. Most developers see a clear divide between when an object or array should be used. There are few cases where you really need to use an array like an object, but no doubt they exist. jQuery is an example of where an Object leverages Array properties, e.g. the elements collected by a selector are added as numeric properties and there is a length property that is the number of elements. That way generic array methods can be applied to jQuery objects (all in ed 3, by the way).

The Object.watch method is in JavaScrpit™, it's not part of ES5 so use with caution.

A major problem with creating your own version of built–in objects is that you'll probably end up wrapping every built–in method in a native one (like jQuery wraps every DOM method pretty much) and start setting getters and setters on every property, or end up with function calls to replace property access (e.g. jQuery's val, attr and prop methods). Rather tedious, and slow if performance matters.

Oh sorry, I mentioned jQuery… :-(

It just seems to be more sensible to design a library or framework to make the best use of the features that the language has, rather than trying to force it to do things it doesn't do well, or does not do natively.

But full marks for trying. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
The difference between Objects and Arrays are more than just the Array's length property. As far as i know :-) there is a couple of ES5 enumerable methods like map,filter being added to recent browsers, however IE9 also supports it. These methods are totally out of reach from native Objects. –  Zoltan Ludanyi Mar 13 '13 at 2:47
    
Here it is: github.com/zludany/enumerable.js –  Zoltan Ludanyi May 21 '13 at 2:14
    
Both map and filter are in ES5, they are both "intentionally generic" do not "require that [their] this value be an Array object", so they will work on any native object with suitable properties. They are not required to work with host objects (but do for DOM objects in many browsers though). –  RobG May 21 '13 at 2:33
    
@ZoltanLudanyi—what is the purpose of the link? Arrays inherit from Array.prototype, but the methods are mostly generic and can be applied to any object using call or apply. So it's possible to create Objects that behave like Arrays. The only difficulty is the special length property, but if the object is sufficiently abstracted, access to the length property can be controlled to ensure it behaves. Hence enumerable.js "works". –  RobG May 21 '13 at 2:39
    
Think first: alert([].map.call({head:15,title:30},function(s){return s+'px'}). join(', ')); ->prints '' It does not work! though: var o={foo:"foo"} Array.push(o, 'foo'); Array.push(o, bar); alert( o.toSource() );//prints:({foo:"foo", length:1, 1:"bar"}) It works! Both are generic ES5 Array call on Object. It is not inherited from prototype, it is a static method of Array! But object doesn't augment this method without "tricks". But providing a trick turned out to be more exhaustive. slid.es/zludany/enumerablejs –  Zoltan Ludanyi May 21 '13 at 6:43

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