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I'm wondering to replace our WinForms technology to WPF. Is WPF mature enough to migrate to?

What are the migration risks?

Is it tweaked and robust enough? Isn't there any plan to deprecate WPF like SilverLight?

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closed as not constructive by Oliver Charlesworth, delnan, Blachshma, Daedalus, billz Mar 12 '13 at 22:58

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Ask the developers.. not us. – Daedalus Mar 12 '13 at 22:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm wondering to replace our WinForms technology to WPF. Is WPF mature enough to migrate to?

Yes.

What are the migration risks?

Time and training to understand SOLID implementations of MVVM.

Is it tweaked and robust enough? Isn't there any plan to deprecate WPF like SilverLight?

WPF is "depricated" in Windows 8... but all of the features are still there - it's hard to explain...

Metro Apps will still use XAML and DataBinding to describe the UI and interraction with the View Model. Applications can still be written in C#, and there is a .net framework dedicated to it (4.5). But instead of compiling to CLR - it compiles into Native Code.

So, while WPF is technically depricating, what we are left with (Metro) walks, talks, and otherwise behaves just like a WPF development effort.

That said, WPF apps can run on the "Classic Desktop" of a Windows 8 computer, and the .net framework 4.0 is still current technology.

P.S. This topic is likely to be closed - you might be able to get better answers at http://programmers.stackexchange.com/

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