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I have a weird situation. Just recently I have been trying to change some code from procedural to object based due to a previous question.

I have several places in the code where it calls functions within functions (please excuse me, I am still learning the terminology for Javascript), whereby 'this' took on different scope.

In trying to maintain the connection with the parent 'this', I attempted to pass the variable through to the function by adding "thisObj = this" to the function calls as follows

geoLoc: function () {
    "use strict";
    var thisObj;
    if (navigator.geolocation !== undefined) {
        navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {
            thisObj.calcRoute('driving', position.coords.latitude + ', ' + position.coords.longitude, true);
        }, thisObj = this);
    }
},

So, this worked with FF so I figured it must be ok. Checked with jslint and everything came up green (or yellow/blue) with no errors in sight.

Chrome however decided there was a "mismatch dom exception 17" and decided not to work with the geolocation.

Just on the offchance, I tried moving that definition so it read as

geoLoc: function () {
    "use strict";
    var thisObj;
    if (navigator.geolocation !== undefined) {
        navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {
            thisObj.calcRoute('driving', position.coords.latitude + ', ' + position.coords.longitude, true);
        }), thisObj = this;
    }
},

Which much to my surprise, worked in both FF and Chrome. Unfortunately it failed the jslint and IE just kicked up it's heels and died.

Now, my question is, what on earth did I actually do in the first place that let it run with FF and pass jslint and how do I rectify the situation without resorting to actually naming the object within that second function, so I can just pass a reference to it.

No jquery please. Straight javascript. And more important than the code to fix it, an explanation as to what I actually did... in laymans terms if possible please, so I can investigate it further.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Javascript you don't need to pass variables all around, since a function has access to variables declared in functions "above" it. Thus you can hold a reference to the current object this in a variable named that (just for the example), as such :

geoLoc: function () {
    "use strict";
    var that = this;
    if (navigator.geolocation !== undefined) {
        navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(function (position) {
            that.calcRoute('driving', position.coords.latitude + ', ' + position.coords.longitude, true);
        }/* if you try to "add" something there, it comes as a 2nd argument for getCurrentPosition*/);
    }
},

You could also say that inner function(s) "contain" the scope of the outer function(s), which is very specific to Javascript and very interesting in its design and in designing applications with it. For more info, look for "function scope" and "closure" in JS.

Edit : the second parameter in navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition is expected to be an error callback, i.e. a function, and you tried to put , thisObj = this there, which may cause some browser failure OR -when executed- actually assign this to thisObj before the success callback (1st parameter of getCurrentPosition) is called and therefore kind of "work" on some other browser. Anyway this is wonky and should be avoided.

I think you need to start with the basic syntax features of JS, like using functions as variables and parameters of other functions (that's what a "callback" is) which is a main concept there. Instead of randomly trying to move parts of code around (my opinion).

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And this was another couldn't see the wood for the trees moment. I didn't even think about just defining the variable in the outer function. Callbacks and such are new to me so I am learning what they are. Thank you. –  Rafe Mar 13 '13 at 8:36

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