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I am trying to load a panel into a java applet, but the contents of the panel do not populate. As you can see from the code below, I set up a test to see where the code in the panel is failing to run, and the results of my test indicate that getRootPane().add(MyLabel) is the line of code that triggers the exception.

All of the code required to recreate this problem is included below. Can anyone show me how to alter the code below so that the contents of the panel get loaded into the applet?

Here is the code for TestApplet.java:

import javax.swing.JApplet;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class TestApplet extends JApplet {

    public void init(){//Called when this applet is loaded into the browser.
        //Execute a job on the event-dispatching thread; creating this applet's GUI.
        try {
            SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    createGUI();
                }
            });
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println("createGUI didn't complete successfully");
        }
    }
    private void createGUI(){
        TestPanel myPanel = new TestPanel();
        myPanel.setOpaque(true);
        setContentPane(myPanel);
    }
}

And here is the code for TestPanel.java:

import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class TestPanel extends JPanel{

    TestPanel(){
        System.out.println("Running in constructor.  ");
        JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("Hello World");
        getRootPane().add(myLabel);
        System.out.println("Still running in constructor.  ");
    }
}

EDIT:

I edited my code as follows, based on the suggestions given so far. Using this.add does cause the JLabel to load, however, an inner class is still not loading, which I have added to the code below. Also, the changed code below is no longer triggering an exception; it just only loads the JLabel but does not load the inner class. Any suggestions as to how to load the inner class?

Here is the new TestApplet.java:

import javax.swing.JApplet;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class TestApplet extends JApplet {

    public void init(){//Called when this applet is loaded into the browser.
        //Execute a job on the event-dispatching thread; creating this applet's GUI.
        try {
            SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    createGUI();
                }
            });
        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println("createGUI didn't complete successfully");
            System.err.println(e);
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    private void createGUI(){
        TestPanel myPanel = new TestPanel();
        myPanel.setOpaque(true);
        setContentPane(myPanel);
    }
}  

And here is the new TestPanel.java:

import java.awt.Canvas;  
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Graphics;

import javax.swing.JLabel;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class TestPanel extends JPanel{
    DrawingLines myDrawingLines = new DrawingLines();  

    TestPanel(){
        System.out.println("Running in constructor.  ");
        JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("Hello World");
        this.add(myLabel);
    this.add(myDrawingLines);  
    myDrawingLines.repaint();  
        System.out.println("Still running in constructor.  ");
    }

//inner class to override paint method
class DrawingLines extends Canvas{
   int width, height;

   public void paint( Graphics g ) {
      width = getSize().width;
      height = getSize().height;
      g.setColor( Color.green );
      for ( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
         g.drawLine( width, height, i * width / 10, 0 );
      }  
      System.out.println("Running in paint method.");  
   }
}//end of inner class   
}  
share|improve this question
    
what exception? – Markus Mikkolainen Mar 12 '13 at 23:07
    
Instead of a System.err in your catch, do a e.printStackTrace() or a System.err.println(e) to show the actual exception .. – Adel Boutros Mar 12 '13 at 23:10
    
If i would have to guess, i would say that the rootpane is null at construction stage and instead you just want to this.add() at that stage. – Markus Mikkolainen Mar 12 '13 at 23:13
    
@AdelBoutros I just tried System.err.println(e) and the exception given is: java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException – CodeMed Mar 12 '13 at 23:14
    
give us the whole stacktrace – Markus Mikkolainen Mar 12 '13 at 23:16
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Set the method as:

 private void createGUI(){
        TestPanel myPanel = new TestPanel();
        getContentPane().add(myPanel);
    }

and the class TestPanel as

public class TestPanel extends JPanel{
    TestPanel(){
        super();
        System.out.println("Running in constructor.  ");
        JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("Hello World");
        add(myLabel);
        System.out.println("Still running in constructor.  ");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. +1 for trying to help. I tried your changes and they do what my edited code above does. I have added a little more code to my posting above because these fixes are only fixing the JLabel loading problem and are not fixing a deeper problem in my code of an inner class not displaying. Are you able to suggest a way to get the inner class to display in my edited code above? That should be the extent of my question. – CodeMed Mar 13 '13 at 0:00

The rootpane is null because the Jpanel has not been added to any component yet. And adding stuff to panel rootpane like that is.. pretty dirty.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Can you suggest a cleaner way to add stuff? This was a Java application, and I am converting it to an applet. eclipse told me to switch getContentPane() to getRootPane(). – CodeMed Mar 12 '13 at 23:23
    
well. do the addition after construction, or add directly to the panel, or directly to the frame. – Markus Mikkolainen Mar 12 '13 at 23:24
    
+1 for helping. I have restated my problem in an edit to my original posting above. Are you able to show me how to get the inner class in my edited code above to diplay in the panel? I am keeping the code above simple, but the original code simplified the problem too much. Displaying the inner class should be the extent of my question. If that works, I will consider this question answered. – CodeMed Mar 13 '13 at 0:04
1  
why not override a paint method in the panel instead? why a separate inner class? – Markus Mikkolainen Mar 13 '13 at 0:10
1  
also i wouldnt use a canvas since it is an AWT component, inside a swing component. You can just modify a swing component to paint differently. – Markus Mikkolainen Mar 13 '13 at 0:11

Let start at the beginning...

public class TestPanel extends JPanel{
    TestPanel(){
        System.out.println("Running in constructor.  ");
        JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("Hello World");
        getRootPane().add(myLabel);
        System.out.println("Still running in constructor.  ");
    }
}

Using getRootPane to add a component to it is the wrong thing to do. You should never need to add anything to a root pane. Instead you should be using the content pane, but that's not what you are trying to do (or should be doing from this context).

Instead, you simply be calling add

public class TestPanel extends JPanel{
    TestPanel(){
        System.out.println("Running in constructor.  ");
        JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("Hello World");
        add(myLabel);
        System.out.println("Still running in constructor.  ");
    }
}

This will then add the label to the TestPane

Lets take a look at the extension...

public class TestPanel extends JPanel{
    DrawingLines myDrawingLines = new DrawingLines();  

    TestPanel(){
        System.out.println("Running in constructor.  ");
        JLabel myLabel = new JLabel("Hello World");
        this.add(myLabel);
        this.add(myDrawingLines);  
        myDrawingLines.repaint();  
        System.out.println("Still running in constructor.  ");
    }

    //inner class to override paint method
    class DrawingLines extends Canvas{
       int width, height;

       public void paint( Graphics g ) {
          width = getSize().width;
          height = getSize().height;
          g.setColor( Color.green );
          for ( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
             g.drawLine( width, height, i * width / 10, 0 );
          }  
          System.out.println("Running in paint method.");  
       }
    }//end of inner class   
}  

First of, you should avoid mixing heavy and lightweight components (putting a Canvas on a JPanel), this is just not worth the frustration it will cause.

There is no need to call repaint in the constructor. At the time the constructor is called, the component can't be painted anyway.

Instead, simply override the panel's paintComponent method

protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g);
    int width = getWidth;
    int height = getHeight();
    g.setColor( Color.green );
    for ( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
     g.drawLine( width, height, i * width / 10, 0 );
    }  
}

I strongly suggest you take a look at

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for taking the time to answer this question. I very much appreciate the time and depth that you shared. All three of the answers that people posted so far work. While yours is the most extensive, I am marking the first one with actual code as the answer. I will read the three links you sent. Thank you. +1 for helping. – CodeMed Mar 13 '13 at 2:13

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