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I'm trying to create an if..else if condition in Erlang within a receive..end. statement in order to pass two variables A and B so that they can be tested for equivalence.

In the shell I tried typing:

6> Pid = spawn(ifelse,receiving,[]).
** exception error: no match of right hand side value <0.54.0>
7> 

What I wanted was to use Pid ! {self(), 1,2}. and Pid ! {self(), 2,2}. to test both cases but something is wrong.

-module(ifelse).
-export([receiving/0]).

receiving() ->
    receive
        {Pid,A,B}->
        if  
            A =:= B ->
                io:format(" B equals A ~n"),
                Pid ! "True";
            A =/= B ->
                io:format(" B does not equal A ~n"),
                Pid ! "False";
            true -> {error, wrong_value}
        end     
    end.

By the way if I have receiving(A,B) instead with two variables how would I spawn that similarly to Pid = spawn(ifelse,receiving,[]).? I tried using Pid = spawn(ifelse,receiving(1,2),[]). but that gave an error.

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2  
The error you got implies that the variable Pid in the shell was already bound. You spawned a new process so you got a new pid which didn't match Pid. Remember that shell variables are also immutable. –  rvirding Mar 13 '13 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As @rvirding commented, Erlang is single assignement. Your problem is probably related to the fact that you have already bound a value to variable Pid and therefore you can't bind any new value to it.

Only in a shell (not recommended in real code) can you unbind a single variable using f(Variable):

1> A = 4.
4
2> f(A).
ok
3> A = 5.
5

or unbind all the variables using f() Notice that this is only for testing purposes.

As far as I can see your code is right, even though I suggest you to use case and pattern matching instead of an if statement.

So I would rewrite your code as follows:

-module(ifelse).
-export([receiving/0]).

receiving() ->
    receive
        {Pid, A, B} ->
            case A =:= B of
                true ->
                    Pid ! "True";
                false ->
                    Pid ! "False"
            end
     end.

You can test it as follows:

1> Pid = spawn(ifelse,receiving,[]).
<0.34.0>
2> ShellPid = self().
<0.32.0>
3> Pid ! {ShellPid, 4, 5}.
{0.32.0, 4, 5}
4> flush().
Shell got "False"

Another thing is that I don't see why you should use a string value for "True" and "False" since you could actually use atoms. Moreover your code can work only once because after the if-else or case the process just dies. You can tackle this issue by using a recursive function.

Here is a module with both the modifications:

-module(ifelse).
-export([receiving/0]).

receiving() ->
    receive
        {Pid, A, B} ->
            Pid ! A =:= B
    end,
receiving().

and here is how to test it (in a new shell so you don't have to use f() ):

1> Pid = spawn(ifelse,receiving,[]).
<0.34.0>
2> ShellPid = self().
<0.32.0>
3> Pid ! {ShellPid, 4, 5}.
{0.32.0, 4, 5}
4> flush().
Shell got false
5> Pid ! {ShellPid, 4, 4}.
{0.32.0, 4, 4}
6> flush().
Shell got true
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If you have define a function receiving/2 in your file, that means you have something like :

-module(ifelse).
-export([receiving/0,receiving/2]).

receiving() ->
    some_code.

receiving(A,B) ->
    other_code.

you may call it with

Pid = spawn(ifelse,receiving,[1,2]).

By the way, it is not usual to write if statements in erlang, The reason is that if one case doesn't match any condition, the code will crash.

5> F=fun(X) -> if (X rem 2) == 0 -> X+1 end end.
#Fun<erl_eval.6.82930912>
6> F(4).
5
7> F(5).
** exception error: no true branch found when evaluating an if expression
8> 

If you want to avoid this, you have to have a default guard (and then it looks like a case).

8> F1=fun(X) -> if (X rem 2) == 0 -> X+1;         
8> true -> X end end.
#Fun<erl_eval.6.82930912>
9> F1(4).                                         
5
10> F1(5).
11> 

The usual way to code your function is more like this:

receiving() ->
    receive
        {Pid,_A,_A} when is_pid(Pid) -> 
                % use the pattern matching to verify that the 2 elements are equal
                % and a guard test to check that the first element is a pid.
                % Note that in this case it is a strict equals. I use _A because the code doesn't
                % care of the value itself
                io:format(" B equals A ~n"),
                Pid ! "True";
        {Pid,_,_} when is_pid(Pid) -> 
                % use pattern maching to verify the that message is a tupple of 3 elements
                % and a guard test to check that the first element is a pid.
                % For the 2 last elements I use _, so the data is not bound to any variable,
                % only the structure is tested
                io:format(" B does not equal A ~n"),
                Pid ! "False";
        _ -> {error, wrong_value}    
    end.

I tested this in the shell:

14> F = fun() ->                                        
14>     receive                                         
14>         {Pid,_A,_A} when is_pid(Pid) ->             
14>                 io:format(" B equals A ~n"),        
14>                 Pid ! "True";                       
14>         {Pid,_,_} when is_pid(Pid) ->               
14>                 io:format(" B does not equal A ~n"),
14>                 Pid ! "False";                      
14>         _ -> {error, wrong_value}                   
14>     end                                             
14> end.                                                
#Fun<erl_eval.20.82930912>
15> Pid = spawn(F).
<0.58.0>
16> Pid ! {self(),1,2}.
 B does not equal A 
{<0.51.0>,1,2}
17> % the returm value of "proc ! Mess" is Mess. It is what we get on the console on previous line
17> flush(). % use flush() to get the messages received by the shell
Shell got "False"
ok
18> Pid ! {self(),test,test}. % the process Pid is terminated now. when we send a message to it, 
18> % it is simply "lost".
{<0.51.0>,test,test}
19> % it is necessary though to use a new variable Pid1 and spawn a new process 
19> % (see rvirding message and user601836 answer)
19> Pid1 = spawn(F).         
<0.63.0>
20> Pid1 ! {self(),test,test}.
 B equals A 
{<0.51.0>,test,test}
21> flush().
Shell got "True"
ok
22> Pid2 = spawn(F).          
<0.68.0>
23> Pid2 ! {hello,test,test}. 
{hello,test,test}
24> flush(). 
ok
25> % of course there is no message sent back, no io:format to print something on the console,
25> % the returned value of the function in the error case is "lost".
25> % if you want to have a permanent process you must have a recursive loop, 
25> % calling receiving() were needed.
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