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I'm trying to create a Stack using templates in C++, everything works fine exepct for the Pop function, that returns the item's address and not actual value, the code is below.

 template <typename T>
 class Stack {

const int size;
T* data;
int index;

public:
    Stack(){};
    Stack (const int S);
    ~Stack(){delete [] data;};
    bool Push (const T& info);
    T Pop ();
    bool is_empty();
};

 template <typename T>
 Stack <T> ::Stack (const int S) : size(S)  // Stack CTOR
 {
  this->data = new T [this->size];
  this->index=0;
 }

 template <typename T>
 bool Stack<T> ::Push (const T& info)
 {  

  if(index==(size-1))
            return false;
   else{
      this->data[index] = info;
      index++;
      return true;}
 }


template <typename T>
T Stack <T> ::Pop ()
{       
    index--;
    return (this->data[index+1]);
} 

 template <typename T>
 bool Stack<T> ::is_empty()
 {
  if(index==0){return true;}
        else
            return false;
  }

And the main() is:

Stack <int> Sint (10);
Sint.Push(6);
int X = Sint.Pop();
cout<<X;  // prints out the address and not the value

thanks in advance !

share|improve this question
    
Where is data initialized? In C and C++ dynamic arrays need a location in memory to hold their stuff. You have only declared a pointer. You delete the allocated memory, but I don't see where you allocated memory for the array. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 13 '13 at 0:10
    
I suggest getting out of the habit of this-> and referencing the item directly. Less typing, less chance of mistakes and not using pointers. –  Thomas Matthews Mar 13 '13 at 0:11
    
there is a CTOR for it, it's not here. –  David Faiz Mar 13 '13 at 0:11
    
@DavidFaiz: Then you'll have to show it I guess –  Andy Prowl Mar 13 '13 at 0:12
    
@Thomas : this-> isn't a bad idea in class templates due to two-phase name lookup. –  ildjarn Mar 13 '13 at 0:12
show 6 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here:

 template <typename T>
 bool Stack<T> ::Push (const T& info)
 {
     if (index == (size-1))
     {
         return false;
     }
     else
     {    
         this->data[index] = info;
         index++; // index becomes 1 after the first insertion...
         return true;
     }
 }

If the stack is empty, you store the item at index 0 an increase the index, which becomes 1. Then here:

template <typename T>
T Stack <T> ::Pop ()
{
    index--; // index becomes 0...
    return (this->data[index+1]); // returning the uninitialized item at
                                  // index 0 + 1 = 1...
}

You are decreasing the index, which becomes 0, and then returning the item at index 1, which was never assigned. What you see printed is not the address of the first element, but the value of the uninitialized second element.

What you should do is:

template <typename T>
T Stack <T> ::Pop ()
{
    if (index == 0)
    {
        // Maybe throw an exception?
        // You should handle the error condition somehow.
        return T();
    }
    else
    {
        index--;
        return (this->data[index]);
    }
}
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