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Lets go for a walk with Bulldog :)

Say I have a namespace Street::House (inside namespace Street) where the class Bulldog is declared (let it be in House/Bulldog.hpp):

namespace Street {
namespace House {
class Bulldog {};
}
}

Then, I have the Bulldog.hpp:

#include "House/Bulldog.hpp"    

namespace Street {
using House::Bulldog;
}

Pay attention to what's going on: I'm injecting declaration of Street::House::Bulldog to the namespace Street as Street::Bulldog with using declaration.

Then, I have the Owner.hpp where the class Bulldog is forward declared:

namespace Street {
class Bulldog;

class Owner {
  Bulldog* bulldog;
};
}

Finally, I have the Owner.cpp:

#include "Owner.hpp"
#include "Bulldog.hpp"

namespace Street {
// Implementation of Owner...
}

Compilation error occurs in the Owner.cpp:

error: 'Bulldog' is already declared in this scope

The natural explanation of this phenomenon seems to be that C++ treats these 2 Bulldog classes as different, but why? I can't see any ambiguity in this case, i.e. it could actually work if properly implemented by compilers.

What workarounds can you suggest? One I can think of is to simply remove forward declaration of Bulldog from Owner.hpp and move #include "Bulldog.hpp" from Owner.cpp to Owner.hpp. However, this will result in exact inclusion rather than forward declaration.

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Clang has a more descriptive message error: target of using declaration conflicts with declaration already in scope –  Kevin Ballard Mar 13 '13 at 0:53
    
This is not a compiler bug, injected declarations don't work like that. –  Stephen Lin Mar 13 '13 at 0:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems you can fix this by changing Bulldog.hpp to say

namespace Street {
    namespace House {
        class Bulldog;
    }
    using House::Bulldog;

    // ...
}

This works for me in Clang.

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Unfortunately, now error simply moved to line 5 of your example, but that was expected as actually nothing has changed. –  Haroogan Mar 13 '13 at 1:04
    
@Haroogan: Really? It compiled just fine for me using Clang. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 13 '13 at 1:09
    
@Haroogan it works fine ideone.com/hGNbp1 (yes, something has changed, using House::Bulldog is not equivalent to declaring Bulldog in Street) –  Stephen Lin Mar 13 '13 at 1:11
2  
@Haroogan, your original doesn't work for the same reason (this) doesn't work, creating a new name for a type does not change the original name; you can't forward declare class Bulldog if it's actually not a class but an using-injected or typedef-ed type name. It's two different namespaces (tag names and types); C++ just lets you use a tag name as a type automatically, unlike C, but they're still distinct. –  Stephen Lin Mar 13 '13 at 1:17
1  
@Haroogan: Because of the way linking works, I don't think it's possible to come up with any technique that completely eliminates the ability to tell what namespace Bulldog comes from by inspecting the header. –  Kevin Ballard Mar 13 '13 at 2:14

Owner.hpp which you wrote as:

namespace Street {
class Bulldog;

class Owner {
  Bulldog* bulldog;
};
}

Should have instead been

namespace Street {
namespace House {
class Bulldog;
}

class Owner {
  House::Bulldog* bulldog;
};
}

You were accidentally forward declaring Street::Bulldog, which is not a real class, instead of Street::House::Bulldog, which is a real class. Therefore, your implementation in Owner.cpp was upset because Bulldog* was ambiguous. It doesn't know if you are referring to the declared class Street::Bulldog or the declared (and also defined, though the compiler doesn't care about that) Street::House::Bulldog.

Since the class you wanted to forward declare is Street::House::Bulldog, you need to include the second, House namespace in your declaration in the .hpp file.

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