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I'm writing the following class

public class UserApplication
{
    private IUserRepository UserRepository { get; set; }

    private IUserEmailerService UserEmailerService { get; set; }

    public UserApplication(IUserRepository userRepository, IUserEmailerService userEmailerService)
    {
        this.UserRepository = userRepository;
        this.UserEmailerService = userEmailerService;
    }

    public bool Authenticate(string login, string pass)
    {
        // Here I use UserRepository Dependency
    }

    public bool ResetPassword(string login, string email)
    { 
        // Here I only use both Dependecies
    }

    public string GetRemeberText(string login, string email)
    {
        // Here I only use UserRepository Dependency
    }
}

I'm using Unity for manage my instances so I realised that I only use both dependencies on only one method so when I ask the container to give a instance for this class both dependencies are inject into this class but I don't need the two instances for all methods so in Authenticate user I only need the repository. So am I wrong doing this? Is there another way that only have the dependecy I use for all cases in this class?

I think of using the Command Pattern to that so I class 3 classes with one method and only the dependencies I need inside that like this:

public class AuthenticateUserCommand : ICommand
{
    private IUserRepository UserRepository { get; set; }

    public string Login { get; set; }

    public string Password { get; set; }

    public void Execute()
    {
        // executes the steps to do that
    }
}



public class ResetUserPasswordCommand : ICommand
{
    private IUserRepository UserRepository { get; set; }

    private IUserEmailerService UserEmailerService { get; set; }

    public string Login { get; set; }

    public string Email { get; set; }

    public void Execute()
    {
        // executes the steps to do that
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
For ASP.NET MVC I could see the first example being more preferable due to the nature of the controller and the latter example would work well with WPF MVVM since you could directly bind your Commands. It really just depends on what technology you're using. – Romoku Mar 13 '13 at 2:34
    
No this class isnt part of ASPNET MVC this a layer of my system. – Greg Mar 13 '13 at 3:55
    
When a class is injected with a dependency that isn't used primarily by that class this may mean that the class might be doing things it is not responsible for, thus breaking the SRP principle which might not be your case, i am just suggesting. – Ibrahim R. Najjar Mar 14 '13 at 1:40

Another approach is to create a role-specific interface for each behavior. So you'd have IUserAuthenticationService, IUserPasswordResetService, and IUserRememberPasswordService. The interfaces could be implemented by a single class, such as UserApplication or they could be implemented with individual classes to maintain SRP. The command pattern you describe has a similar advantage for SRP. One issue with the command pattern is that those dependencies still have to be provided by something. If the dependencies are provided by the controller, then you still have to get the dependencies to the controller in the first place and you are left with a similar problem as your first example.

The trade-off in the role-specific interface case as well as the command pattern is a loss of cohesion. The cost of this is certainly a matter of preference and perspective as is the degree to which you want to enforce SRP. On one hand, the cohesion provided by having a single class handle authentication related behavior can be beneficial. On the other hand, it can lead to a dependency misalignment as you describe.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok but if I create a single interface for each behavior and implement the interfaces on a UserApplication class you agree with me that when I ask to container to give me a instance of this class the other 2 dependencies are inject into UserApplication so the problem still continues. And how about ask the container to give me a instance for the dependency on each method? – Greg Mar 13 '13 at 3:53
    
I really prefer having the interfaces for each behavior and implement that on a single class but I`m not really comfortable to do that because my system will have a lot of classes with a single method. – Greg Mar 13 '13 at 3:58
    
Yes, if UserApplication implements all interfaces you're back where you started. And yes, with the role-specific interface approach you will end up with a lot of classes. This is the trade-off. You either have lots of small, dedicated classes or bigger, possible conflated classes. These are part of the pitfalls of OOP that are addressed by functional programming. – eulerfx Mar 13 '13 at 3:59

I usually implement a form of the command pattern as you are considering doing. However, it also has elements of what eulerfx has mentioned. I just call them tasks. For example:

public interface ITask
{
    void Execute();
}

public interface IAuthenticateTask : ITask {}

public interface IResetPasswordTask : ITask {}

I then implement these and have the required dependencies injected. So I have role specific interfaces and implementations.

I would not go with the service locator as you stated in your answer bit.

When I do have a situation where I need access to various tasks as I do in the controller of an ASP.NET MVC project I use property injection instead of constructor injection. I just have my DI container (I use castle) require certain injections based on a convention at runtime.

In this way I can still easily test the controller since I do not need to provide all the constructor injected objects but only those properties that I need for the test, with the added benefit that certain injected properties will still be required just as would be provided by constructor injection.

update:

There are a couple of options available using this approach. The main interface one would be interested in for a task is the role-specific one. The inherited interface(s) such as ITask would be only for convenience in simple cases. It can be extended also with generics:

public interface ITask<TInput>
{
   void Execute(TInput input);
}

public interface IOutputTask<TOutput>
{
   TOutput Execute();
}

public interface IOutputTask<TOutput, TInput>
{
   TOutput Execute(TInput input);
}

Once again these are for convenience:

public interface IAuthenticateTask : IOutputTask<bool> {}

// or

public interface IAuthenticateTask : IOutputTask<AuthenticationResult> {}

You could work just on the role level:

public interface IAuthenticateTask
{
    AuthenticationResult Execute(string username, string password);
}

One need only rely on the role-specific interface for dependencies.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man! and about the ideia this simple class with the Execute method and then use the UserApplication to handle then? like this public bool Authenticate(IAuthencateUserTask task) { task.Execute(); } – Greg Mar 13 '13 at 4:52
    
I have updated the answer to illustrate some options when relying (as one should) only on the role-specific interfaces. – Eben Roux Mar 13 '13 at 5:33

So am I wrong doing this?

No. 2 dependencies are not the end of the world, they don't make the constructor bloated or unreadable.

Previously given answers would be good fits for cases when you have 3-4+ dependencies though.

You could also occasionally pass a particular dependency as a parameter to a method if it is only used in that method. In this sense, you might want to give Unity's method call injection a try although I'm not sure it was precisely intended for that purpose.

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