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I'm having troubles trying to match a pattern of dates. Any of the following dates are legal:

 - 121212
 - 4 9 12
 - 5-3-2000
 - 62502
 - 3/3/11
 - 09-08-2001
 - 8 6 07
 - 12 10 2004
 - 4-16-08
 - 3/7/2005

What makes this date matching really challenging is that the year doesn't have to be 4 digits (a 2 digit year is assumed to be in the 21st century i.e. 02 = 2002), the month/date can either be written with a beginning 0 if it is a one digit month, and the dates may or may not be separated by spaces, dashes, or slashes.

This is what I currently have:
/((((0[13578])|([13578])|(1[02]))[\/-]?\s*(([1-9])|(0[1-9])|([12][0-9])|(3[01])))|(((0[469])|([469])|(11))[\/-]?\s*(([1-9])|(0[1-9])|([12][0-9])|(30)))|((2|02)[\/](([1-9])|(0[1-9])|([12][0-9])))[\/-]?\s*(20[0-9]{2})|([0-9]{2}))/g

This almost works, except right now I'm not exactly sure if I'm assuming the length of the dates and months. For example, in the case 121212, I might be assuming the month is 1 instead of 12. Also, for some reason when I'm printing out $1 and $2, it is the same value. In the case of 121212, $1 is 1212, $2 is 1212 and $3 is 12. However, I just want $1 to be 121212.

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is year "00" 2000 (technically the 20th century) –  ysth Mar 13 '13 at 2:55
1  
Is there a question? –  Brad Koch Mar 13 '13 at 3:03
2  
Seems to me like this is impossible to do with 100% accuracy: 11213 could be 1-12-13 or 11-2-13. Both are valid dates. –  uptownnickbrown Mar 13 '13 at 3:06
    
Indeed, I guess in those cases I will just assume the date is 1-12-13. I don't need 100% accuracy, I just need to get most of the cases down. –  dtgee Mar 13 '13 at 3:22
    
my answer seems to have been deleted, not sure why. it has information not in the others. –  ysth Mar 13 '13 at 4:32

4 Answers 4

Your task is ambiguous, since you may not be able to tell mmd from mdd or mdccyy from mmddyy.

You left off the option for spaces or dashes in one place where you match /.

You aren't checking for leap years.

This is doable, but it's awfully easy to make a mistake; how about not trying to do it with a regex.

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The CPAN modules Time::ParseDate and DateTime are probably what you're looking for, except the 62502 pattern:

use DateTime;
use Time::ParseDate;

foreach my $str (<DATA>) {
    chomp $str;
    $str =~ tr{ }{/};

    my $epoch = parsedate($str, GMT => 1);
    next unless $epoch; # skip 62502

    my $dt = DateTime->from_epoch ( epoch => $epoch );
    print $dt->ymd, "\n";
}

__DATA__
121212
4 9 12
5-3-2000
62502
3/3/11
09-08-2001
8 6 07
12 10 2004
4-16-08
3/7/2005

Once you have the DateTime object, you can extract year, month, and day information easily.

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This solution handles all of the cases that you provided. But the solution isn't foolproof because the problem has ambiguities. E.g. how do we interpret the date 12502? Is it 1/25/02 or 12/5/02?

use 5.010;
while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @date = $line =~ /
        \A
        ([01]?\d)   # month is 1-2 digits, but the first digit may only be 0 or 1
        [ \-\/]?    # may or may not have a separator
        ([0123]?\d) # day is 1-2 digits
        [ \-\/]?
        (\d{2,4})   # year is 2-4 digits
        \z
    /x;
    say join '_', @date;
}

__DATA__
121212
4 9 12
5-3-2000
12502
3/3/11
09-08-2001
8 6 07
12 10 2004
4-16-08
3/7/2005
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you've got "day" and "month" backward in the comments –  ysth Mar 13 '13 at 21:16
    
thanks @ysth. Fixed that now. –  stevenl Mar 13 '13 at 23:22

This is the best I could come up with based on what info you've given. It matches all possibilities, and has error checking for month/day ranges and also the year (from 1900 to 2099)

/(1[012]|0?\d)([-\/ ]?)([12]\d|3[01]|0?\d)\2((19|20)?\d\d)/
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