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say I have a method that returns a type:

private Type GetPersonOrOrganisation(someParameter)
{
  either return Person type or Organisation type
}

Then I call this method:

Type type = GetPersonOrOrganisation(someParameter);

I then try to create a new instance of the returned type:

var newContact = Activator.CreateInstance(type);

What I'm left with is that newContact is of type object. What I wanted was newContact to be of either type Person or Organisation depending on what was returned from GetPersonOrOrganisation.

Does anyone know how to get the newContact cast to the correct type?

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1  
That doesn't make sense. The type of a variable exists at compile time, before you know what that will be. You want an interface. –  SLaks Mar 13 '13 at 2:58
    
Nitpicking, but "Organisation" is spelled "Organization", with a 'z'. –  Inisheer Mar 13 '13 at 2:58
    
@Inisheer depends on your language; en-us agrees with you, en-gb agrees with user2005657. –  JohnLBevan Mar 13 '13 at 3:03
1  
Nice catch... nitpicker! :) –  Inisheer Mar 13 '13 at 3:05
    
Spelling diffs: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Inisheer Mar 13 '13 at 3:11

5 Answers 5

This definitely has some code smell to it. But there are perhaps some ways around it.

You might want to consider an interface that both person and organization implement if you are going to interact with them the same way. Or maybe a base class, depending on your specific scenario.

Beyond that, we probably need what you're trying to do afterwards to be able to give suggestions. Without the interface (or some other base class), you can't have ONE object that can be either of those types. The only thing they have in common currently is object.

You could do some different things like if (newContact is Person) { } else if (newContact is Organisation) { } or similar depending on your scenario, but that's really getting into the code smell unless you're absolutely stuck with those objects and methods the way they are.

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You can return an initialized object from the function and test it using GetType() and typeof. Below is one example (certainly Tim's example will work as well).

public class Person
{
}
public class Organization
{
}

class Program
{
    // Generate a Person if i == true or Organization if i == false
    static object GetPersonOrOrganization(bool i)
    {
        if (i == true)
        {
            return new Person();
        }
        else
        {
            return new Organization();
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var p = GetPersonOrOrganization(true); // Generates a Person.

        if (p.GetType() == typeof(Person))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Person!"); // This prints.
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Organization");
        }

        var o = GetPersonOrOrganization(false); // Generates an Organization.

        if (o.GetType() == typeof(Person))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Person!");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Organization!"); // This prints.
        }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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You need somethign like this:

public interface IPersonOrganization {
}
public class Peron : IPersonOrganization {
}
public class Organization : IPersonOrganization {
}

private IPersonOrganization GetPersonOrganization(bool isPerson) {
  if (isPerson) 
    return new Person();
  else
    return new Organization;
}
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Here's one way; though this assumes a parameterless constructor exists:

using System;

namespace StackOverflow.Demos
{

    class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            new Program();
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
        private Program()
        {

            Type type = GetPersonOrOrganisation(new Person());
            //object myInstance = GetInstanceOfType(type);
            var myInstance = GetInstanceOfType(type);
            Console.WriteLine(myInstance.ToString());

            type = GetPersonOrOrganisation(new Organization());
            myInstance = GetInstanceOfType(type);
            Console.WriteLine(myInstance.ToString());

        }
        private Type GetPersonOrOrganisation(object what)
        {
            return what.GetType();
        }
        private object GetInstanceOfType(Type type)
        {
            //return type.GetConstructor(new Type[] { }).Invoke(new object[] { });
            return Activator.CreateInstance(type);
        }
    }

    public class Person
    {
        public Person() { }
    }
    public class Organization
    {
        public Organization() { }
    }
}
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Couldn't you have just used Activator.CreateInstance? For the default constructor there isn't that much performance overhead. –  Romoku Mar 13 '13 at 3:24
    
@Romoku yup - just tested that and you're right - I'd not played with Activator before so went the way I knew. . . however that makes my solution the same as the question. Unless the bug is somewhere else (i.e. in the methods summarised by pseudo-code in the question)? –  JohnLBevan Mar 13 '13 at 3:26
    
Please see my alternate answer - I've given two answers based on two interpretations - the above works for getting an instance of the expected type. However if that's already working in your code it's more how your code handles that type that's the issue - my other answer shows how to handle that scenario. –  JohnLBevan Mar 13 '13 at 4:03

Is this the issue you're having?

public void Demo()
{
    var myInstance = Activator.CreateInstance((new Person()).GetType());
    Console.WriteLine(Test(myInstance));
}
private string Test(object x) //this is the method being called
{ 
    return string.Format("Object - {0}", x.ToString()); 
}
private string Test(Person x) //this is what you were hoping for
{ 
    return string.Format("Person - {0}", x.ToString()); 
}
private string Test(Organization x) 
{ 
    return string.Format("Org - {0}", x.ToString()); 
}

One fix is this (not recommended):

public void Demo()
{
    var myInstance = Activator.CreateInstance((new Person()).GetType());
    Console.WriteLine(Test(myInstance));
}
private string Test(object x) //redirect the call to the right method
{
    if (x is Person)
        return Test(x as Person);
    else
        return Test(x as Organization);
}
private string Test(Person x) { return string.Format("Person - {0}", x.ToString()); } //this is what you were hoping for
private string Test(Organization x) { return string.Format("Org - {0}", x.ToString()); }

A better solution is this:

public interface ITestMethod { string Test();}
public class Person : ITestMethod
{
    public Person() { }
    public string Test() { return string.Format("Person - {0}", this.ToString()); }
}
public class Organization : ITestMethod
{
    public Organization() { }
    public string Test() { return string.Format("Org - {0}", this.ToString()); }
}

//...
public void Demo()
{
    var myInstance = Activator.CreateInstance((new Person()).GetType()) as ITestMethod;
    Console.WriteLine(myInstance.Test());
}
//...
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